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View Full Version : How High would you go?



Mr. Haunt
02-04-2007, 11:16 AM
So when it comes time to building wall panels, how tall would "you" build the panels?

Jim Warfield
02-04-2007, 11:24 AM
To save lumber you could make them only 6 ft, you could make them 5 ft, most people won't be trying to scale them anyway, them somebody could hide and pop up for an anyplace scare if all the walls were 5 ft.
"Last time he popped up and got me right here." Then he pops up over there!

MindWerxKMG
02-04-2007, 12:22 PM
I use 8' walls throughout the haunt. I have 12' and 16' walls in the my pre-show "grand hall/lobby" area and my dining room scene has two massive 16' window towers.

damon carson
02-04-2007, 12:48 PM
Most haunts I've seen and ours we build are 8ft. At the Darkness I think I've seen them use 12 ft walls and I have an idea how they do those. But they also build them to the ceiling as well. There interlocking wall system is also very impressive. No bracing involved! Larry should make a video on some of these building techniques alone. They could make a small mint from it. Some very impressive stuff.
Damon

Duke of Darkness
02-04-2007, 12:54 PM
Mr. Haunt -- Most walls are 8' high simply because most wall panels are made from standard sheets of plywood (4' X 8'). You can, of course, make walls any height that you choose, but if vary from the standard you are adding additional labor and expense.

Dave

Hell American Freak
02-04-2007, 03:39 PM
8' at the minimum... 4' x 8' is the general size for plywood and gipsom anyways, you'll save time and effort if you just utilize them the way they are.

I'm 6', 1" tall, I see over the top of a 6' panel with little effort...

Jim Warfield
02-04-2007, 05:12 PM
I have always wondered why the thin (crappy) osb wafer board is used, doubled up on two sides of a 2 by 4?
If you wanted strength, thinner walls (easier to store and configure), why not use the albeit, more expensive per/sheet, but only use one sheet, of 3/4 inch plywood instead, it will take paint 50 times better, not be abrasive with flakes and be much quicker to build,easier to lay flat and store since no 2 by 4s would be used.

Hell American Freak
02-05-2007, 09:05 AM
We are a temporary haunt, everything gets tore down at the end of the year and put back together again the next year... I really don't feel like lugging around 3/4" plywood for 2 months. The skin on our walls is only 1/8" thick, our house gets the snot beat out of it and we've never had a problem with durability. If you just put some simple frame work inside the walls it won't break when impacted.

Raycliff Manor
02-05-2007, 09:34 AM
Damon said,


At the Darkness I think I've seen them use 12 ft walls and I have an idea how they do those. But they also build them to the ceiling as well. There interlocking wall system is also very impressive. No bracing involved! Larry should make a video on some of these building techniques alone.

I'll second that motion! That's a great idea! I'd still love to see footage of the creation of the sets using the blown insulation foam as well!

Kel

dr0zombie
02-05-2007, 01:23 PM
With a full time location you can go 16 - 20 feet tall with your scenes. Just keep in mind that if you ever lose your location moving these monsters is hellish if you don't build them with mobility in mind. Learning the hard way sucks..... :evil:

I have never seen a haunt in a non-full time location use more than an 8 foot wall system. I would like to see someone who has accomplished mobile, easy to use, sets over 8 foot.

.....and.... I wouldn't mind knowing how Larry built the Darkness stuff...

MindWerxKMG
02-05-2007, 01:33 PM
My haunt was built by Halloween Productions and I have 8', 12' and 16' walls (my location is permanent and has 20' ceilings). PM me if you have specific questions regarding it's construction.


There interlocking wall system is also very impressive. No bracing involved!. The interlocking wall system does require some bracing across the top of the walls.

gadget-evilusions
02-05-2007, 02:06 PM
We are a temporary haunt, everything gets tore down at the end of the year and put back together again the next year... I really don't feel like lugging around 3/4" plywood for 2 months. The skin on our walls is only 1/8" thick, our house gets the snot beat out of it and we've never had a problem with durability. If you just put some simple frame work inside the walls it won't break when impacted.

I don't think your haunt gets beat enough. We use either one or two sheets of 1/2" plywood on one side of a full 2x4 fram with another 2x4 down the middle, and we still get people going straight through them. Granted, they are some huge guys, lol.

Karl Fields
02-05-2007, 03:06 PM
dr0zombie,
In our "non-full time location" we have quite a few 16' walls and a few at 20'.
It can be done :)

Greg Chrise
02-05-2007, 07:10 PM
All ya need is a Subaru with a roof rack and a dream.

Jim Warfield
02-05-2007, 07:18 PM
I too have built very strong walls from 2 by 2's covered with only 1/4 luan, BUT I did anticipate the punch and kick zones of the average person from 5ft5 to 6 ft. tall and that is where I put the extra blocking in that wall .
Of course 40 miles from here is a roadside tavern that saw regular hole-punching taking place above the urnial so they put 2by 4 blocking behind the plasterboard with spike's points awaiting any intruding, plaster-breaking fist.
It finally happened , the guy was doing this on a monthly basis!
He hurt his hand!!?
They all went to court.
The Judge said, No. Threw out his case, the tavern paid nothing.
Let's hear it for that Judge!! "YES!"

Hell American Freak
02-05-2007, 08:38 PM
We are a temporary haunt, everything gets tore down at the end of the year and put back together again the next year... I really don't feel like lugging around 3/4" plywood for 2 months. The skin on our walls is only 1/8" thick, our house gets the snot beat out of it and we've never had a problem with durability. If you just put some simple frame work inside the walls it won't break when impacted.


I don't think your haunt gets beat enough. We use either one or two sheets of 1/2" plywood on one side of a full 2x4 fram with another 2x4 down the middle, and we still get people going straight through them. Granted, they are some huge guys, lol.

1/8" lauan is extremely flexible, when someone impacts one of our walls, if they don't break the whole 4' x 8' wall loose, they simply bounce off of it. An actor striking the wall with a prop like a pipe or a hammer is more likely to break through the wall then a customer, which does happen. Think of it like snow shoes, the smaller the footprint the more likely it is to break through. A customers entire body impacting the wall distributes the force over a larger area then a small blunt object, resulting in them simply bouncing off the walls. Besides, it's more fun to watch them bounce back then just hit it and stop... :P

Jim Warfield
02-05-2007, 08:47 PM
If all your walls were 3/4 inch plywood, you could sell them for alot more money someday as lumber because they would still all be in pretty good condition, versus sickly Luan or dieseased osb.
Somebody could actually use them to build a real house, use them for flooring , roofing.....
So the investment would be not totally hosed like starting with the inferior cheaper products= junk.

Hell American Freak
02-07-2007, 09:00 AM
Our flimsy Lauan walls, as you would say, are in their fifth year of use and NOT in any major need of repair despite the yearly beating they take... I don't think I need to worry about "wasting money" on "inferior" wood. I'll will trust our Owner's judgement who just so happens to be a Licensed Framer...

Jim Warfield
02-07-2007, 10:02 AM
The customer abuse one's walls must take does depend alot in the customers you have and the haunt's style of scaring.
Cramming more bodies/per/hour through a place also makes for more abuse to the walls and other vandalistic problems.
I once bought 25 very cheap , hollow core doors for 25cents each, these were covered with what must have been 1/16th inch panels, yet after three or four years only one or two of them had been kicked in.
Of course these flimsey doors were heavilly triangulated as installed, but most of them were used as two-sided walls.

Hell American Freak
02-07-2007, 10:16 AM
We can sit a here and pick at eachothers descriptions of our houses until we're blue in the face. We are in different areas with different demographics of customers. What works for me here may not work for you. Our establishment takes just as much if not more of a beating then all of the other permanent attractions around us. We've had the best and worst in customers and abuse trown at us for numerous years, thus far our establishment has survived to laugh at it.