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gregsalyers
02-21-2007, 02:47 PM
Does anyone have any sample (or old) floor plans they would be willing to share. I would love to get a sense for how detailed your written plans are before you actually build.

Frighteners Entertainment
02-21-2007, 03:35 PM
I do some digging around and see if I have anything that I kept from the last few years.

Ironman
02-21-2007, 03:48 PM
Here are some, without text though.
http://tinyurl.com/2qcr94
It's a mix of Rose Red and the game Clue....sorta, kinda. You'll get the idea I think.

jason
02-21-2007, 04:49 PM
what are some good tips when it comes to writing out a floor plan?

how do you go about figuring out how much lumber/materials (fencing, vacuforms, ect.) you'll need for you haunt?

PumpkinHead
02-21-2007, 06:50 PM
Here are some, without text though.
http://tinyurl.com/2qcr94
It's a mix of Rose Red and the game Clue....sorta, kinda. You'll get the idea I think.

Ironman,
Rose Red is probably the BEST mini-series ever. Are there any pics of the finished Haunt?
-PH

Mr Nightmarez
02-22-2007, 05:02 AM
Best thing to keep in mind is laying it out to where each actor gets 2 or more scares. Everyone preaches it, and we thrive to get up to 4 or 5 scares on slow nights from some of our actors.

I get the building measurements, room ideas, and then I lay it out. Add the walls and keeping in mind security, actor access and cut backs to allow multiple scares.

I guess I never really thought how I did it, I just do it... :twisted:

Ironman
02-22-2007, 05:23 AM
Not yet, this is the plan for this year, and I am presently building the props for the various rooms. If all goes as planned, I will start setting up the walls late next month. Our city building department and fire marshal have already given thier approval, so we are ansty to get started. Doing the Rose Red concept, where the house is the main character, has been a dream of ours for years, and because of that, we have been collecting some of the static furniture and detail pieces for quite some time. But then quite a few of the furnishings come alive, so those had to be built first. Since we do a rather theatrical interactive style haunt, we have always tried to build with as much detail as we can, but this will be our most ambitious plan to date and we're really looking forward to it.

gadget-evilusions
02-22-2007, 05:47 AM
Ironman,

Are you going to have it done for Ironstock this year so we can all see it?

Ironman
02-22-2007, 06:10 AM
Hey Brian,
Unfortunately, probably not this year. When we opened the house for tours last year, even though it was a lot of fun turning other haunters loose through to check it out, we really had to bust butt to re-fit with a different floor plan for the upcoming season. This year we will be about mid-way through the build out, so I just don't see it happening. I seem to be getting older every day, and I find that just about everything takes a little more time than it used to. But our plan is to keep this same basic design for at least two seasons, something we've never done before, and simply make upgrades and improvements. So maybe we can do this for '08. Providing they are not already built into the house, I will have a few of the new animations for this haunt at Ironstock to display.

Jim Warfield
02-22-2007, 07:25 AM
And, of course when you make old furniture "Come Alive" the first order of business is to hide a steel frame under and behind it so it can keep coming alive numerous times without destroying itself quickly, but most of us probably already practise this. Experience is a good teacher.
(Then you attach your heavy-duty hinges and pnuematics to the steel frame)
Welding is nice.

Ironman
02-23-2007, 10:52 AM
That's pretty much it Jim, except most of the time, for my own anyway, I build the entire prop framework with steel, and then simply 'cover' it with wood or some other type of a more indestructable material rather than trying to re-work an existing piece of furniture.
Go to:
http://tinyurl.com/2hq49m
And scroll through to see:
Bed
Juke Box
Pinball Machine
Chair

All of these are built with a steel tube frame, and then covered with 1/4" or 1/8" hardboard.

Nightmaretony
02-24-2007, 10:26 AM
Cute. Can't get over the ShockOla jukebox gig....

Jim Warfield
02-24-2007, 12:48 PM
When it comes to "Floor Plans", I really hope that my floor doesn't have any, I hope it just keeps laying there.
(sounds like an ex of mine!)

slash
02-26-2007, 07:51 AM
I usually make an overview of the whole haunt, then seperate ones for each room. Mark where the scares are, electrical outlets, lights, etc. If possible, make hallways for staff to get from room to room.

gregsalyers
02-27-2007, 11:36 AM
Now that everyone is back, I thought I would renew my request. Thanks for everyone that already posted...

Frighteners Entertainment
02-27-2007, 11:37 AM
I did forget to ask, what sq. ft. are you doing for this yr?

gregsalyers
02-27-2007, 01:25 PM
The space I have is 7200sq ft...about 5000 will be used for the haunt....the rest will makeup, costumes, maintenance, mechanicals, etc

Ironman
02-28-2007, 05:03 AM
[quote] Cute. Can't get over the ShockOla jukebox gig....

Thanks Tony. The jukebox is one of the many 'one off' props we will be offerring up at the Prop Swap this year. Bring a truck and we'll load you up.

Nightmaretony
02-28-2007, 09:03 AM
not so much the prop but the joke, got a Seeburg been restoring here and there (as in way distant future). Wantred to get a Rockola Princess model someday. So the name gig had me in hysterics. Thanks on the thought though, wont be able to drive from Socal anytime soon though :(

Jim Warfield
02-28-2007, 10:28 AM
A Seebug body on a 98 inch T-bucket frame would be quite a ride, Tony.
"It looks like a spaceship from 1955!"
Or maybe some of those 1950 cars looked like Seeburgs?

Ironman
02-28-2007, 10:31 AM
So Tony, how close did we come to the 'look' of a real juke box?

Ironman
02-28-2007, 12:02 PM
Getting back on topic, here is the plan drawing we used for '05:
http://tinyurl.com/3dccze

And here is a fantasy drawing of a purpose built building that we dreamed of doing a few years back:
http://tinyurl.com/39kcaz

gregsalyers
02-28-2007, 02:28 PM
Ironman...thank you very much. That is exactly what I was looking for. If anybody else has some I would love to see them.

Greg Chrise
02-28-2007, 02:47 PM
Über die Bauschuttdeponie am "Seebug", lag ein Gutachten des Ingenieur-büros Renner vor. Dabei wurde festgestellt, dass bei vollständiger Auffüllung der

Nightmaretony
02-28-2007, 11:42 PM
Not bad, not exact but pretty good. Was original and fun there.

Ironically, the one I do have that will take a ton of work is a butt ugly unit, the Seeburg FL-1 which has the nickname of "the coffin" in the industry. black and chrome box with a 100 stack of 45 record holder in there.

jason
03-02-2007, 08:48 PM
Getting back on topic, here is the plan drawing we used for '05:
http://tinyurl.com/3dccze

And here is a fantasy drawing of a purpose built building that we dreamed of doing a few years back:
http://tinyurl.com/39kcaz

what sort of program do you need to do your floor plans like that?

slash
03-03-2007, 05:32 AM
Yes what program do you use? Those look great, and it appears that the yellow highlight part is an acces way for staff??? Thats what I was talking about in my previous post.

Ironman
03-03-2007, 06:26 AM
The program is 3D Virtual Reality Architect, and yes the yellow areas are actor alleys. The program has some really cool features. You can view birds eye 3D aspects from all angles, add furnishings and fixtures from an included stock list, and even do a virtual walk through of the layout. This one is made by Swift, but I have another one called 3D Home Architect that is a Borderbund product. It has most of the same features.

gadget-evilusions
03-03-2007, 07:15 AM
It's not many people that would actually put up there floor plans, hell, I havne't seen anyone else do it before. I am going to have to get the ones from our haunt into the computer and put them up. Infortunately I can't scan them because they are size d paper. And there are 4 of them for each year. I better get to redrawing them in the computer.

jason
03-03-2007, 07:33 AM
another thing that is really nice about this type of floor plan is that it's great to show your local fire marshall.

Barry
03-03-2007, 08:01 AM
There is a nice Triangular Grid program at http://www.boopack.com/software.html . It also works for 90 degree layouts as well.

Jim Warfield
03-03-2007, 09:07 AM
90 degrees would see customers complaining because of the heat.

Ironman
03-03-2007, 09:37 AM
Not only is having a defined floor plan layout handy for the fire marshal and building inspector, but we submitted them to prospective insurance carriers to show them our safety conscience planning. And it was also a great marketing tool for negotiating with our primary investors. It adds a great amount of confidence for the money people to see a well thought out project laid out in front of them.

TheGallows
03-05-2007, 11:53 AM
Just curious, Do you move every year? Your haunts change shape and layout alot. How do you show your investors the layout without knowing what building you will use. How do you get the building without money from your investors? Just curious, if you do move every year, how do you do the electrical for your haunt with temporary locations? Sorry, I am just picking your brain..... I just feel like I must be missing a step of how your are doing it.

Ironman
03-05-2007, 12:21 PM
The castle plan was one of those “If you had unlimited funds, what would you do?” concepts. But the other two were our plans from 2005 and our plan for this coming season. I did not run across the 2006 plans, but they all use the identical floor space since we have had the same building for three years. Two years before moving to this location, we bought the contents of an existing haunt from a neighboring state, so we had a definite theme to work toward. The fellow we lease from was kind enough to allow us access to the building before we signed a contract so that we could get the local building inspector and fire marshal in ahead of time to give us the verdict on what had to be done to open a haunt. Within two weeks I had the initial floor plan drawn up, approved, and we signed a short term lease. Since we had the location, almost all of the props needed, an explicit plan, and the experience behind us from operating a trail haunt for a few years before this move, we had no trouble convincing our investor to take the plunge along with us. After our first season we signed a long term lease for a lower price and we hope to stay there for many years to come.

gregsalyers
03-05-2007, 01:10 PM
So you have the building year round?

Ironman
03-05-2007, 01:21 PM
Yes, we do. It gives us the advantage in working on it through out the year, plus it is a two story building so we could eliminate the rental of a warehouse by moving all of our excess props there. And another good reason is that we have location recognition since we have a billboard size sign on it, and the facade stays decorated year round. Our haunt is in a very busy section of town that hosts a variety of summer activities, and eventually we want to get to the point that we open periodically during the year for special events.

Ironman
04-06-2007, 03:15 PM
Gadget Said: It's not many people that would actually put up there floor plans, hell, I havne't seen anyone else do it before. I am going to have to get the ones from our haunt into the computer and put them up. Infortunately I can't scan them because they are size d paper. And there are 4 of them for each year. I better get to redrawing them in the computer.

So Brian, did you ever get around to converting your plans so we can see them?

gadget-evilusions
04-06-2007, 04:42 PM
nah, not yet. Maybe after hauntcon I will try.

Uptown Haunts
04-08-2007, 06:46 AM
Hi, Everybody,

With this being my first year doing a pro haunt, I was wondering what passage way widths work best for effect and effectively moving your patrons through the haunt without any bottlenecks occurring. With some being too narrow, people at the end of the line can't really see what's happening up front. The confining of people in a small space obviously adds to the overall fear factor but where is that happy medium?

Steve....

Empressnightshade
04-08-2007, 07:49 AM
Steve,

the rule of thumb, at least for me, is four feet or just shy of that. I do this for several reasons. One is that it keeps the Fire Marshall happy. The other is that not everyone is of average size. Let's face it, in our small industry alone, there are quite a few of us who are of large frame -- I am one of them. I therefore like to make sure there is enough room for everyone to pass without feeling singled out.

At Transworld's Fronzen Tundra Tour, I toured one haunt that had two sections that were so tight, I had to walk sideways. When I yelled out to the crew member giving us the tour that I was a Big Mamma and would I be able to squeeze through, he told me while I was in the midst of the tiny section that they also have a wheelchair route to get around that spot. Well, that's just it, you see. I'm not disabled, so why should I be forced to seperate myself from my group and take a wheelchair exit? In my opinion, there are other ways of making customers feel uncomfortable.

Good Luck with your first season, Steve! :)

Jim Warfield
04-08-2007, 06:49 PM
In one very narrow passageway(that there is another way around) some people would ask loudly, "How does a BIG person make it through here?"
Upon hearing their cue one of my larger helpers in October says, "Like this!" as they run with both arms straight above their heads and pass through very quickly! (Very funny to watch!)
Those 90 degree corners create anticipation and opportunitys to scare.
I like the right side of people coming to such a spot since most people are right -handed and to punch me would then require an aukward across the body , foreshoertened swing of their left fist.