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View Full Version : AIR CANNONS! $199 Revolutionary Design



UnDeRTaKer313
06-22-2010, 12:16 AM
3 Problems with the Consumer Air Cannon
-COST $300-$1500
-Dangerous/High Air Pressures -(125psi can inject anything in its path into a guest's skin)
-Large Volumes of Air Required

3 Benefits of our "Perfect Cannon"
-Cost $199
-30-40 PSI Operating Pressure
-Tank is ready to be fired every few seconds, without over-working your compressor


We are now offering this cannon to the Haunted Attraction Industry for $199
http://i843.photobucket.com/albums/zz360/Hellsgate2009/ProfessionalAirCannon.jpg

The reason the cannon is one of the cheapest on the market is because of the way it is designed. It has never been done before. It eliminated expensive valves and manifolds, the power is all in the engineering of the entire apparatus.

Your getting the power of 125 psi cannon that costs $500 and your only using 30 psi at a cost of just under $199.


CLICK FOR VIDEO
30PSI! Hitting a Prop
http://i843.photobucket.com/albums/zz360/Hellsgate2009/th_MonsterBlast.jpg (http://s843.photobucket.com/albums/zz360/Hellsgate2009/?action=view&current=MonsterBlast.mp4)
CLICK FOR VIDEO
30PSI! Hitting Paper (Compare to Competitors Video)
http://i843.photobucket.com/albums/zz360/Hellsgate2009/th_PaperBlast.jpg (http://s843.photobucket.com/albums/zz360/Hellsgate2009/?action=view&current=PaperBlast.mp4)
CLICK FOR VIDEO
30PSI Hitting a Piece of Styrofoam
http://i843.photobucket.com/albums/zz360/Hellsgate2009/th_StyrofoamBlast.jpg (http://s843.photobucket.com/albums/zz360/Hellsgate2009/?action=view&current=StyrofoamBlast.mp4)
For more information or to place an order
info@ihphaunts.com

MindWerxKMG
06-22-2010, 07:12 AM
I'll ask you the same question I asked RockandTiff about their air cannons. Do you have product liability insurance? I would not buy an air cannon, or any other potentially dangerous prop, from any company that does not carry product liability insurance.

gadget-evilusions
06-22-2010, 09:56 AM
It appears that you are operating a quick exhaust valve using a sprinkler valve. Please tell me this is not the case.

Dark Attraction
06-22-2010, 10:58 AM
Looks pretty impressive at only 30 PSI.


It appears that you are operating a quick exhaust valve using a sprinkler valve. Please tell me this is not the case.

I was wondering the same thing. If you are trying to reduce cost this way, McMaster Carr has a very reasonable pilot valve for their quick exhaust valves... about $50 (the QEV is in the $50 range as well.)

Boni
06-22-2010, 03:17 PM
It appears that you are operating a quick exhaust valve using a sprinkler valve. Please tell me this is not the case.

Kind of new to air cannon specs, but what is the downside to this kind of set-up.

Allen H
06-22-2010, 04:33 PM
simply put Boni, the downside are explosions.
To Undertaker313
Check out the boomer cannons from minions web
His run at low pressure as well and recharges in about five seconds. They have been around awhile also which says alot in this Biz.
Please note I am not knocking your design at all (I dont know enough about them to do so). I am just pointing out a product that already fills the nitch you are after. Since your products are similar you might make mention of them in some way (or not if you dont want that comparison). Just watch claims of "the perfect air cannon".
Good luck with it.
Allen H

UnDeRTaKer313
06-23-2010, 10:51 AM
Hey guys! Not going to confirm how they operate, but we do appreciate the positive comments.
Minion Web makes some great cannon it appears!
Our weakest valve in our system is rated for 150psi operating pressure, and we suggest to operate the cannon at 30-50psi. So there is no concern there. Your compressor cannot supply 150psi, your saftey release valve will pop at 120-125 PSI.
We would not release a product that isn't safe.

Dark Attraction
06-23-2010, 12:57 PM
The real problem with using plastic in any sort of pneumatic system isn't the pressure rating, the real issue is what happens when plastic pipe or components burst... they tend to send razor-sharp shrapnel flying everywhere.

The valve might hold up to pressure, but what happens when something hits it, or the air hose gets yanked? If you use PVC air line, what happens when your customers run into the walls and they shift?

Sound far fetched? I know of one attraction that put in a brand new PVC air distribution system. During the season, a wall shifted and the main pipe burst. The next year, they had to put in a brand new air system... STEEL this time!

I was at a paintball field a few years back and the owner was filling a PVC potato cannon. I was about 15 feet away when that thing went... there was razor sharp shards of plastic everywhere. The guy had to go to the emergency room with some pretty bad cuts to his face.

MindWerxKMG
06-23-2010, 01:40 PM
Hey guys! Not going to confirm how they operate, but we do appreciate the positive comments.
Minion Web makes some great cannon it appears!
Our weakest valve in our system is rated for 150psi operating pressure, and we suggest to operate the cannon at 30-50psi. So there is no concern there. Your compressor cannot supply 150psi, your saftey release valve will pop at 120-125 PSI.
We would not release a product that isn't safe.

It does not matter if you think they are safe and you did not answer my question. Do you have product liability insurance?

SinisterControls
06-23-2010, 03:38 PM
Pneumatic pressure ratings and water pressure ratings are NOT the same. Nearly all water valves have pressure ratings over 120psi but that doesn't mean you can put 120psi air thru them safely.

The reason for this is because water is virtually incompressible and only a small quantity of energy needs to be introduced to increase the pressure significantly. Air, however, is compressible and as a result, much more energy has to be put into the gas to raise its pressure. In fact, at the pressure ranges normally used for pneumatic cannons, up to 200 times more energy is stored in compressed air compared to water at the same pressure and volume. So, should a valve, joint, pipe, or any other component fail under pressure when using compressed air, the energy can be released with deadly force!

Some plasic pipe is safe for pneumatics. It has been designed with a inclusion that will split the pipe rather then allow it to shatter. You have to verify the pipe rating to be sure.

We carry both general and product liability coverage. Itís not cheap but itís the cost of doing business. Be forewarned, even with product liability insurance, if a manufacturer knowingly uses a valve not rated for the application then it is considered gross negligence. At that point there is good chance that you will be in breech of contract and your insurance will be null and void. Keep in mind if you buy direct from China you assume the role of manufacturer and must also carry product liability.

My 2 cents,
Scott

kpolley
06-24-2010, 08:12 AM
Just wanted to add somethig here. I know people are always going on about using sprinkler valves in props, but I think the general thoughts on this are too vague. I have used them before, and continue to now, and have no doubt about the safety of what I'm building. It's really a case by case basis.

Air and water pressure are different, yes. But the pressure rating on the valve has nothing to do with that. Pressure is pressure. There may be more energy in the air... but that doesn't affect the rating on the valse. The valve can handle a certain amount of pressure and it doesn't care what the medium is. The only way that the stored energy becomes a factor is if the valve fails. Then the air could project sharpnel further than water could.

As for the potato cannon, it was likely standard schedule 40 pipe and that would scare the hell out of me to charge with compressed air. Not to mention that the tanks they use to fill off of at paintball fields are several THOUSAND psi. That's a recipe for disaster.

My valves that I use are, of course, pressure rated for 125psi...but above that they are UV resistant and made from shatter resistant plastics. I'm not concerned about their safety. Remember, for a long time scarefactory was using all plastic valves that are made for pneumatics. I don't personally like those valves, but the point is that plastic can easily be used for pneumatic applications if proper care is taken.

gadget-evilusions
06-24-2010, 08:54 AM
I am not here to argue. I just want to point out one important thing you said Kip. "scarefactory was using all plastic valves that are made for pneumatics." Made for pneumatics being the key phrase. The valves they were using were made by Mead. They were rated and designed for air pressure. If anyone can show me where a sprinkler valve is rated for 125psi air pressure, and not just water pressure, I will agree with their use. Until then, I only use valves designed for air pressure when controlling air. Sprinkler valves are just fine if your using them to control water, for example some style of water blasters.

It always comes back to whether a product is rated for air or water pressure, some times they are rated for both. For example, a contractor installed an air system at my day job. They used schedule 80 pvc pipe that was rated at 450psi. Unfortunately they were unaware that it was 450psi water pressure, and that it was actually recommended by the manufacturer to not use with air, it was only rated for water pressure. The continuous fluctuations in pressure as use varies fatigued the plastic and a 2" 90 elbow blew up and shot shrapnel from the ceiling and into my face. Woo hoo. Now our system was reinstalled using 1-1/2" black pipe, which is rated for gas/air pressures far above the 100 psi out system runs at.

Once again, I am not here to argue. I just like to see all the items put into all of our haunted attractions be as safe as possible. Being a machine designer and manufacturer at my day job, I can tell you that we don't use parts that aren't specifically designed for the exact purpose they are used for. We should use that same practice in the haunted attraction industry.

Jim Warfield
06-24-2010, 11:22 AM
I worked cutting threads and installing piping for 15 of my adult years in homes and factorys, gas lines (low pressure) and hydralic lines(high pressure) for factory use, steel pipe also comes with higher or lower ratings for pressure, the easiest way to tell is the printing on the sides of the pipe or just lift the pipe or look at the sidewall thickness.
I found that the 1/2 galvenised steel pipe I bought from Memards was crap!
Made in china, thinner walled, threads cut that didnot seal probably because they tapered the threads wrong (no taper at all?) and these problems we there when using the fittings made by the China company that made the pipe!
When I needed gas piping here I searched for and used pipe made in the USA and it was just like "Old-Home Week!", turn the wrench, the fittings tighten up, no leaks!
What brand of air valve (not plastic) would any of you recommend with a higher volume of air passage for a device that is not an air cannon?
I'm not interested in air cannons here, I like subtle effects, mostly.
The local distributor of cylinders and valves closed awhile ago.

gadget-evilusions
06-24-2010, 11:39 AM
PM sent Jim. I didn't want to hijack the thread too badly.