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blaze
05-07-2012, 05:37 PM
Anyone have any advice for cheap advertising that is effective(besides Facebook, twitter, website) we are trying to explore new avenues without breaking the budget. Thanks.

Haunted Prints (EOM)
05-07-2012, 05:56 PM
That is a pretty good deal. Email marketing is really cheap and easy as well.

Is it legal for them to sell the students emails?

Frightener
05-07-2012, 07:21 PM
It's only illegal if they advertise that they WILL NOT do so. Just like websites taht you sign up on, even this one here, if it doesn't say "We will not give / sell your information... yada yada" then they have every right to do so!!

And that's where a lot of your spam probably comes from :P

Haunted Prints (EOM)
05-07-2012, 08:00 PM
Mail Chimp if my favorite email marketing provider.

They allow up to 2000 email subscribers and 12000 emails a month for FREE. No strings attached, they only require there logo at the bottom of the email, just like most other providers who still charge you.

Plus they have a ton of easy to use templates and click tracking tools.

MailChimp..... http://eepurl.com/ePMFY

BrotherMysterio
05-09-2012, 03:07 PM
Spamming people is generally a bad idea, and a good way to generate some very negative word of mouth, which will cost you double in marketing costs: one half being the cost of counter-acting that negative word-of-mouth, and second half being in opportunity costs of not being able to use those tight resources more effectively, specially when it counts, like getting a haunt ready to open for season.

C.

BrotherMysterio
05-09-2012, 11:02 PM
Business-wise you could not be more incorrect.

You're kidding, right?

I don't know what your particular trade is outside of haunting, but one of mine is in Web Publishing. If you spam thousands of college students, some who are computer students, and know how to report spam to their ISP's, then you can have your account suspended.

Not only that, there isn't a single reputable autorepsonder or email marketing service, such as Aweber, Get Response, and others, that doesn't require strict anti-spam measures, such as double opt-ins for list building, opt-out and unsubscribe links at the bottom of every email, and so on. If they were to even get the slightest inkling that you used spam techniques to start building your list, or they get any complaints about spam from people on your list, they would terminate your account.

Also, what happens if you list the haunt website in the email? That would tag the website as spam related. Also, what major charity or corporate sponsor would want to be related to a bottom-feeding, spamming outfit? Least you think me being indignant and melodramatic, name one serious and respectable business entity that regards spammers as anything other than bottom-feeders.

Now, as to whether or not spam works, well, of course it does. If you blast enough emails out about cheap Viagra (approx. 80% of spam is pharma related), a certain percentage of desperate guys who can't get it up will probably respond. That's a given. But the various antics to make the business practice work (and that term is used in the loosest sense possible) are pretty wooly, wet, and wild, to say the least. Very often spammers need to constantly crank out new email addresses, often indecipherable gibberish, as they get the old ones shut down and as the email filters filtering out the offending addresses and so on.

Also, starting a successful haunt is based on fostering good will, and building a community spirit and mentality. That is a far cry from the hit-and-run, smash-and-grab techniques of spammers.

So, sure, you might get a few more patrons, but I would not be able to in good faith recommend spamming as a way to build a positive web-presence. Not because of any personal convictions, tho I definitely do hold strong anti-spam convictions, but because I truly believe, from a business standpoint, that operating using bottom-feeder practices is no way to build a solid foundation for a long term business.


I understand some people are almost religiously against unsolicited bulk email. But it works. $300 for a direct line to an entire university of target audience is pure gold in marketing terms.

Well, since you speak so favorably of spamming practices, can we assume that you use them in your day job or current business you own?

As for the value of such a list, well, I really don't' know what you would do with it, apart from spamming a bunch of people. Perhaps if there were physical addresses, you could perhaps send out postcards offering a coupon and whatnot, but again I can't recommend spamming.

Also, I'm not sure if you appreciate or know of the marketing principle of multiple impressions or exposures, but that discussion is for another time.

C.

FablesStudios
05-09-2012, 11:45 PM
Haunt websites, flyers, parades are coming up and cross marketing with other haunts.

Peter T
FS

BrotherMysterio
05-10-2012, 12:21 AM
No.

Yes, I figured as much.


You make a whole lot of assumptions

If you mean as to your business practices, I merely made deductions, which apparently were true.


but there's no point in arguing with someone who already knows everything. ;)

Oh, I fully concur.


Blaze asked if there were any low budget options for marketing. I gave one. It works for me and lots of others... and I've made zero enemies using it. Sue me for contributing to the conversation.

Well, I'm sure the Viagra folks would say the same thing. I guess we'll have to agree to disagree.

C.

Skeered
05-10-2012, 06:18 PM
I plan on being around for awhile so I am not going to ruin my reputation by being a spammer. There is a reason Walmart, Target, Best Buy etc... do not spam. What MrFoos is saying is that Walmart is wrong??? I guess if you don't give a shit about your reputation or are a fly by night crowd then spamming would probably work for the short term.

Skeered
05-10-2012, 08:38 PM
And by the way, I get spam from almost every major store: Walmart, Best Buy, Target, JC Penny. And I have never signed up directly with those guys.


Baloney. Whatever you have received was the result of your signing up in one way or another with one of these "Reputable" companies.





I'm starting to understand why so many haunted houses fail.
:roll:



That is the mature business attitude I like to see in people.

Skeered
05-10-2012, 09:03 PM
I'm starting to understand why so many haunted houses fail.
:roll:



I have a college in my town with 10k students. I would rather take that $300 and have extra flyers printed than have a spam list. I have in the past given the flyers to all the dorm monitors and they each in turn passed them out to all the dorm residents. I have a relationship with the workers in the food court areas where I can put them right next to the registers. I can reach most of the campus students this way and do it in a much less invasive way. Not to mention they have a physical flyer in their hand versus a spam filter or del key. Gives the feeling of a much more local and personal touch too versus email.

Jim Warfield
05-10-2012, 10:43 PM
Grab the mic to the full dorm adress system and yell about your haunted house. Maybe a very creative, scary voice, sound defect or phony news bulletin first to get everyone's full attention?
Sure. This will work.
Shimer College used their full dorm address system to fill out their basketball team on game night:"Attention! Anybody know how to play basketball? Come on down here and try on a uniform!"
(And that is how they now hold the small -collegiate record for the most continious losses ever! I got to see some of those games! It was HYSTERICALLY ENTERTAINING and memorable!)

BrotherMysterio
05-10-2012, 10:56 PM
Baloney. Whatever you have received was the result of your signing up in one way or another with one of these "Reputable" companies.

Or it could also be one of those "third party announcements" options that auto-populate whenever you sign up for new email addresses, social media and networking accounts, and so on. There are so many "legit" ways for major companies to engage in email marketing, that they don't need to do baldfaced, blatant spamming.


That is the mature business attitude I like to see in people.

Indeed.


I mean, when I was in college I would be PISSED if I got a campus approved email about a haunted house in my college mailbox.

Well, that confirmed my suspicions that you really don't understand this whole legit, white-hat marketing thing.

Obviously, if the college sent out a mass mailing about an event that was tied into the college's mission statement, that would be legit, like say for instance something that supported a campus charity or the alumni association, and the student body shouldn't be any more offended by that mailing that any other mailing, like for instance some announcement from the Student Union, or the Entertainment Committee promoting an event.

That truly would be gold, and at $300 a pop, a bargain.

If, however, you just spam everyone, then there is no tie-in to the school - nothing "approved" - and you are just like any other spammer. If so, you realistically only have one shot at sending out an email that could be seen as spam. People are either interested or they are not, but in any direct marketing campaign, you realistically only have a 4% success rate. That's the target. Anything more than that, and direct marketers are usually dancing in the street.

So, we are talking only a 4% response on any emails that actually get thru and aren't flagged by the spam filters. To get any more traction than that, you would need multiple impressions or contacts, and if that was the case, then we are not talking about a one-time mailing, but rather vexatious and aggressive spamming.

Also, the fact that you can buy the email list of the student body from the school probably isn't common knowledge. In this day and age of identity theft, most people are especially sensitive to such things and would be livid to know that their information was made so easily accessible by a trusted institution.

Either way, we'll have to agree to disagree on this one.


I'm starting to understand why so many haunted houses fail.

Indeed. Questionable, short-sighted, fly-by-night business practices, and all that . . .


I have a college in my town with 10k students. I would rather take that $300 and have extra flyers printed than have a spam list. I have in the past given the flyers to all the dorm monitors and they each in turn passed them out to all the dorm residents. I have a relationship with the workers in the food court areas where I can put them right next to the registers. I can reach most of the campus students this way and do it in a much less invasive way. Not to mention they have a physical flyer in their hand versus a spam filter or del key. Gives the feeling of a much more local and personal touch too versus email.

Having a local college nearby is a true goldmine, and doesn't require any spamming at all. Not only are these all excellent methods to reach people, but there are so many other marvelous ways to market to them thru-out the year, and build an awareness for your event or show.

Not only that, it is also very easy to build an opt-in email list, which is legit, and where the recipients actually look forward to receiving your emails, rather than anxiously looking to delete them.

C.

Haunted Prints (EOM)
05-10-2012, 10:57 PM
http://www.spamlaws.com/spam-laws.html

BrotherMysterio
05-10-2012, 11:34 PM
I just like to point out that it's not illegal to send an unsolicited email as long as you are clearly identifying yourself and your business as laid out in the Can Spam act. Having apparently stumbled into a snakes den of religious anti-spam zealots who resort to personal attacks, I resign... as I'm sure most contributors due under the unrelenting pressure of the Wikipedia moderator generation.

And BrotherMysterio, you remind me SO much of my older brother it's crazy. Can't wait to see the "quote=" and witty retort for each line. ;)

Well, I thought you weren't going to argue with a "know-it-all", yet you do try unrelentingly to get the last word in (something that your older brother probably finds amusing), but, either way, since the general consensus is that most people here aren't keen on spamming, I think it only appropriate that we press on, sans spam suggestion.

C.

Skeered
05-10-2012, 11:43 PM
Or it could also be one of those "third party announcements" options that auto-populate whenever you sign up for new email addresses, social media and networking accounts, and so on. There are so many "legit" ways for major companies to engage in email marketing, that they don't need to do baldfaced, blatant spamming.




I finally rented a movie from Redbox for the 1st time 3 weeks ago. When it got to the part of asking for your email address I grudgingly typed it in. I knew I would receive some junk mail but didn't know what. Over the next week I received junk email from about 25 different senders. A couple reputable namebrands such as Snuggle fabric softener and Welch fruit snacks was the top two I recognized and they offered samples with their ads. Took about a week to stop receiving emails after unsubscribing to all of them. If anything I am quite impressed that when I unsubscribed, that meant unsubscribe and not a bunch of crap trickling in slowly. Just goes to show how much value is placed in not pissing off potential customers.

BrotherMysterio
05-10-2012, 11:54 PM
I finally rented a movie from Redbox for the 1st time 3 weeks ago. When it got to the part of asking for your email address I grudgingly typed it in. I knew I would receive some junk mail but didn't know what. Over the next week I received junk email from about 25 different senders. A couple reputable name-brands such as Snuggle fabric softener and Welch fruit snacks was the top two I recognized and they offered samples with their ads. Took about a week to stop receiving emails after unsubscribing to all of them. If anything I am quite impressed that when I unsubscribed, that meant unsubscribe and not a bunch of crap trickling in slowly. Just goes to show how much value is placed in not pissing off potential customers.

Indeed. Incidentally, you don't have to enter an email address. You can opt out of that.

C.

Skeered
05-10-2012, 11:58 PM
religious anti-spam zealots who resort to personal attacks


What personal attack?

BrotherMysterio
05-11-2012, 12:08 AM
You mean like this?

No, more like that.

Frankly, I'm not interested in a flame war, which is pointless. Either way, like I said, we'll simply have to agree to disagree.

As for your other question, I have no idea what you are talking about. Who exactly are you emailing? The college registrar? The head of the entertainment committee? What exactly are you talking about? I'm not sure you're clear on your actual question.

Either way, there are legit ways to build email lists where the recipients are actually happy to receive email messages, and those email messages are considered value added.

Apart from that, I'm not quite sure why you've spent some seven posts promoting spamming as a legit business practice. I'd say we simply press on with other methods of cheap to free marketing methods.

C.

Jim Warfield
05-11-2012, 01:42 AM
Has to be or to get noticed to have a chance of stimulating customers.
What do they notice? Usually something strange, funny, different from the perceived "norm", I say.
When the Ford Motor Company began they were just barely in business when some anonymous person began printing postcards with simple cartoons making fun of the Model "T" Ford!
This was Ford's secret marketing tool that worked very well, considering how many years they manufactured the same car and how many they sold.
People like to laugh and think at the same time. (Some feel it as the ultimate challenge, maybe?)
My old, first flyers were full of my own drawings and silly sayings and people noticed them, thought about my place. Another bunch of my flyers for many years featured an original poem I wrote, with funny lines concerning my house and how people reacted to fear.
Some young men would have contests with one another in a tavern 30 miles away as they were shooting pool attempting to recite that poem from memory! (I would then assume this did stick with them then..)
My first "Haunted Parade car" was not a hearse, it was a 1979 Ford Thunderbird with a huge dent in the passenger door that I filled with a motorcycle wreck that happened to have a skeletal rider still seated on the bike! This Got Noticed!
I would drive this car 25 miles away to go shopping and people would follow me right back to my house!
Everytime I drove this car around people would show up that night because of seeing it.
I still think good advertising requires much more "Thought" than "money".

BrotherMysterio
05-11-2012, 07:34 AM
I still think good advertising requires much more "Thought" than "money".

But that's not "advertising". That's marketing. Advertising is buying ad space. Marketing is getting into your customer's heads, and occupying a space there.

Put another way, marketing isn't a form of advertising, but advertising is a form of marketing.

Also, most all of the stuff Jim just listed is free, or at least dirt cheap.

Think about the response he got with his car. People didn't just notice and say, "oh, that looks nifty". They actually followed him back to his show. It was that engaging. That kind of thing is pure marketing gold.

Also, the poem contests at local taverns? That has more stickiness and staying power than all the radio and tv spots that you could imagine, and doesn't cost a dime!

C.

HauntedDeadEnd
05-11-2012, 10:31 AM
I think we are going off topic. The thread is about cheap advertising for a Haunt. Please stay on topic. Thanks

BrotherMysterio
05-11-2012, 02:10 PM
I think we are going off topic. The thread is about cheap advertising for a Haunt. Please stay on topic. Thanks

Well, recent bouts of thread hijacking aside, the last two posts were definitely about cost effective marketing. Ergo, the distinction I made.

When people ask about "cheap advertising", whether they know it or not, they are really asking about cost effective marketing. Cheap advertising is merely a function of how to get the lowest rate on radio, TV, and print ads. There is definitely merit in that conversation, but the greater concept is cost-effective marketing (of which cheap advertising is just one part), and, besides, you shouldn't pay a single dime on advertising until you have the other key aspects of marketing in place, and until you know for drop-dead certain what your key message is.

If your message is simply that "We have a Haunt! Woohoo!! Here's the address", then that might get some traction; but if that Haunt happens to be a Slaughterhouse type haunt with blood, guts, sinew, and ripped-out spines strewn all over the walls - and your ad runs in venues that cater to a family crowd - well, the last thing you want is to have families of little 'tweens and younger ones going thru a haunt with people getting violently ripped open, vivisected, mutilated, disemboweled, and otherwise tortured, with torrents and fountains of blood spewing everywhere. Not only would your ad spend be grossly misappropriated and squandered, but you also just bought yourself a whole ton of bad word-of-mouth.

Likewise, what if your ad plays in the more church-friendly venues, and your ad copy looks rather innocuous, and you have a bunch of church types show up only to find out that the name of your Haunt is "Satan's Lair", and you have tons of Satanic and anti-Christian imagery, with Satan triumphing over God, virginal Sunday school girls being defiled, and so on? Well, again, that can be a problem. As Wicked Farmer recently pointed out, moderate church groups of the non-evangelical and non-fundamentalist variety can be a goldmine as long as you don't include anything in your show that happens to be patently offensive to church types.

Then, of course, there's the classic example of a haunt doing fairly well using an orange-with-black-font-type billboard that lists the hours and location of the haunt, and then one season they get the idea of really making the billboard "pop" so as to compete with other haunts, so they include gory or grisly images, like a psycho clown chainsawing a coed, and suddenly they have a hard time getting corporate sponsors, or charities to partner with.

You have to know your brand inside and out, and know what your show is about, and who you are specifically appealing to, and you need to know that solid before you spend any money on advertising, cheap or not. All of that falls under the category of effective Marketing, and the more cost effective, the better.

More later.

C.

scottylmt
05-11-2012, 03:30 PM
Excellent point about keeping your theme prominent and consistent throughout your marketing; I have achieved great success in my massage clinic by using these statements "No FLUFF. This is not a day spa." People instinctively know we offer deep tissue and none of that aromatherapy stuff. A simple message brings in business.

As a haunt CUSTOMER, I will say the same holds true. Im 30, and I want extreme violence and depravity. Intense scares too. I've interviewed 15 high school kids and counting, and the common words were "intense, actually scary, not for little kids, no cheesy stuff." I would expect the college kids to be somewhere in the middle of that, and my own depraved mind. A simple flyer would be gold IF worded appropriately.

Im successful in business so id like to chime in on the university email list, since it is very cheap for so many PRIME candidates for haunt customers..

Its always smart to view things in the mind of customers. As a customer, I don't like email spam. But WHY? Because I have to delete it. The key here is im not mad, more like "wtf where'd THIS come from?" If it continues to happen, then I become frustrated. Its especially frustrated when its something I already know is out there... "Duh I know Viagra makes me hard and I can get it over the net for cheap!" It gets annoying. The same would happen if I constantly pushed out stuff about my clinic, which is why I don't do that.

HOWEVER, for a seasonal event in the ENTERTAINMENT industry, the rules change. Especially for a first year haunt. As a CUSTOMER, I wouldn't be offended or annoyed by an announcement of an upcoming, NEW event. Take an example I would never go to since a haunt I am biased toward... I get an email "RAINBOW PRIDE PARADE! Oct 30th, $8." Now, I could receive that email once a week for the month, and not get mad; everyday is another story.

scottylmt
05-11-2012, 03:37 PM
So that's how I would feel as a customer about an event I don't care about. If it was something I DO care about, then id actually be appreciative to know there is another choice for haunts this year. Here's where Brother M's specificity advice comes in... personally id be ECSTATIC to get a spam email saying a "Brutal, Intense and 16+" haunt is opening this year.

As a business owner, i agree with the consensus that spam is bad, but only if overdone. This isn't something to do the entire year tho for sure because its not relevant the whole year, and it would get annoying. Bottom line, if done tastefully once a week for four weeks... its a gold mine with no negative pr.

BrotherMysterio
05-11-2012, 04:37 PM
As a business owner, i agree with the consensus that spam is bad, but only if overdone. This isn't something to do the entire year tho for sure because its not relevant the whole year, and it would get annoying. Bottom line, if done tastefully once a week for four weeks... its a gold mine with no negative pr.

Ah, well, that can be a very tricky judgement call.

I'm not adverse to a little bit of gray-hat every once in a while, but I would prefer to have a much more targeted ad send than, say, blanket-spamming the entire student body; and whatever was sent out would have to count as a seriously value-added email, say, with a coupon for either "a half-off ticket or free speed pass upgrade, plus a free t-shirt (which, naturally, has your marketing material printed on it) if you bring a copy of this email with you, plus first 50 patrons with college ID get a free combo meal from the concession stand" and so on. You could also present it as a press release type thing. There are possibilities, but just sending out spam-fodder isn't as productive as some might like to think. You're not doing yourself any favors just by sending out an email saying "hey, look, we have a haunt! Ain't that something!?!"

Also, there are tons of awesome opt-in opportunities as well, such as visiting the website and joining the "holiday event planners'" newsletter for free, or whatever, and getting a guide on "how to have the most awesome holiday (*cough*halloween*cough*) parties ever", and so on. Iow, you want to grease the skids with value whenever possible . . . especially value that you can freely supply.

For instance, one idea for as you get closer to the season, and your haunt is built out, is that you could sponsor, or at the very least host, a mixer for the college, or perhaps some of the fraternities or sororities. That sort of thing. Get the social trend-setters at the school interested. Things like that. (You provide the venue and some swag; they provide the food and beverage, etc.)

Not that I would take this approach, but if you were to follow the 2003 CAN-SPAM Act to the letter, and just do one or two mailings or whathaveyou, then you'd want to make that mass mailing count, and to that end you'd want to have opt-in options at your site, or have the email be a coupon of some sort. Iow, give it significant value, vs. being some random email that might get blocked by the spam filter and that even if they did want to keep it, would have to keep track of it, and remember where they stored it, and so on.

But then again, it sounds like the kind of haunt you would go for, and one you would produce, would be like the Slaughterhouse style I outlined above, and if that's the case, even in that I'm not sure a mass-mailing to the entire student body would produce favorable results. Only a very small demographic would go for that. And if there were links to the past events gallery on your website with all of the bits about "people getting violently ripped open, vivisected, mutilated, disemboweled, and otherwise tortured, with torrents and fountains of blood spewing everywhere" like I mentioned, then that could actually have a very negative backlash. All the more sensitive types would be greatly offended.

Of course, that negative kind of publicity could be what you are looking for if you want to play the shock card in a big way. Kinda like the line from P.T.Barnum, "Say whatever you will about me, but make sure you spell my name right!" ;)

Btw, I have nothing against Slaughterhouses. I think they're great for those that enjoy that sort of thing. It's not my style, but if it works and you can sustain your business model with it, I say "go for it".

C.

PS. - if the "any publicity is good publicity" ethos is your thing (and there's definitely nothing wrong with that), you could also write a scathing review or guest editorial of your haunt under a nom de plume, talking about the abhorrent moral turpitude of your event, promoting evil, bestiality, carnage, and violence, yadda yadda yadda, and then submitting said article or editorial to all the church campus outreach programs, and on-campus church youth centers, for their newsletters.

Hey, it worked for Ozzy and Iron Maiden (and Alice Cooper, and KISS, and Marilyn Manson, and . . . .). The PMRC's "explicit lyrics" warning label was the best thing that ever happened to Metal, right after Tony Iommi getting his finger tips chopped off, of course.

halloweenroom
05-11-2012, 11:00 PM
I think you should try contacting Aliens from another planet via YouTube videos. Just my 2 cents:rolleyes:

hsmag
05-25-2012, 07:44 PM
Not sure if this has been said before, but sometimes full-color printed materials can be cheap, even free in some cases.

Figure out what you're going to get printed first (tickets, flyers, posters, etc). There are places online like clubflyers.com, vistaprint.com, jakprints.com where you can get quotes on printing projects by entering the type of materials you want printed, colors and quantity. Once you know which company you're going to go with, figure out the total price including shipping. Let's say you order 5,000 flyers at a cost of $250 plus $50 shipping, then you go to one or more local businesses or even a current sponsor and offer them space on your printed materials for $325 (the actual price you offer it to them for will need to be fair according to your previous attendance as well as estimated attendance).

We had double-sided 4x6 postcards printed up and we offered the sponsor half of the back. They took us up on the offer and we got our postcards printed for nothing. If you get the right sponsor they may even help you distribute your flyers. All in all it was very successful for us and it didn't cost us anything to get our materials printed. You can do the same for tickets as well. Hope this helps some.

BrotherMysterio
05-26-2012, 10:14 PM
Not sure if this has been said before, but sometimes full-color printed materials can be cheap, even free in some cases . . . We had double-sided 4x6 postcards printed up and we offered the sponsor half of the back. They took us up on the offer and we got our postcards printed for nothing. If you get the right sponsor they may even help you distribute your flyers. All in all it was very successful for us and it didn't cost us anything to get our materials printed. You can do the same for tickets as well. Hope this helps some.

Brilliant idea. You can also make those flyers coupons to give them extra perceived value.

C.

SeanMassacre
05-27-2012, 07:03 PM
We offer printing for the haunt industry. Message us or email us about great pricing and fast turnaround.

sean@pixelpushersinc.com

blaze
05-27-2012, 08:25 PM
WOW didn't mean to cause so much controversy, we do all the flyers, posters, parades, Facebook, as well as radio spots, I was looking for so cheap advertising you guys use that's a little outside the box.

BrotherMysterio
05-28-2012, 02:24 AM
WOW didn't mean to cause so much controversy, we do all the flyers, posters, parades, Facebook, as well as radio spots, I was looking for so cheap advertising you guys use that's a little outside the box.

"Controversy"? What controversy? Just lively debate as usual.

C.

scottylmt
05-28-2012, 09:45 AM
One idea I had was to infiltrate the nearby high schools. Find some high school kids and pass out a handful of free passes and do a night you're not normally running. Get them to tag pictures, check in and like your page in return...that should create a facebook buzz.

One idea I saw on here from years back... get an actor in costume and hit the local bar scene passing out coupons. Id add that id ask them to like our facebook page. If your facebook is targeted properly, any buzz will be a goldmine.

Promote your website with business card sized flyers... they're cheap as hell and if they're targeted strongly, a few good words and a picture will get them to your site.

Create fake google reviews for your google places account. It will make you more relevant in search results. Also people naturally look at listings with reviews first.

Me im going hardcore, so im going to make ONE low review about how "awful" it was. That it was SO intense, that my kid couldn't sleep and was crying, and how there's no need for such intense gore in Nebraska lol. Of course the owner gets a chance to respond...

Get the news involved like the hollywood brats... call the paparazzi on YOURSELF.

Make sure your photo op is professional and conveys a message; that picture will be seen by thousands once kids start tagging themselves...

SeanMassacre
05-28-2012, 03:38 PM
Scotty. The fake reviews are just a shady thing to do. The other ideas, like the high school kids and the actors at events, are ones we have used. They work. The part about a free night on a typically slow night we did last year. This year we are marketing it to the village employees, local businesses and other prominent people so that they can pass it on by word of mouth.

We can help with any printing of free passes or any help with ideas you may need.