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Hell House 666 LLC
07-18-2012, 10:11 PM
Hey guys, I was jst starting work on this years haunted house. I've kind hit a wall(GET IT?) I could use some help.

Can anyone give me advice on the best way to build a wall panel?

I need a way to do them quick;y but cost is also on issue.


THhanks...

Allen H
07-19-2012, 12:28 AM
http://www.hauntworld.com/haunted_house_forums/showthread.php?18288-How-To-Build-a-Wall-Panel

Hell House 666 LLC
07-19-2012, 12:56 AM
Thanks for the link!

Thats not what i ment.

BrotherMysterio
07-19-2012, 06:16 AM
Thanks for the link!

Thats not what i ment.

JB Corn's book has a lot of excellent info on that and goes into the topic thoroughly. In fact, he tells you how to build an entire haunt from the ground up . . . literally. (His was built on a deck so it could be built over any terrain . . . an ATH: All Terrain Haunt!) I can send you the link to a PDF version if you like. His books are now free and in the public domain.

C.

Allen H
07-19-2012, 07:20 AM
Can you rephrase your question? You asked how to make a wall panel. I sent you link to pdf on how to make one and how to make a jig to make one. What am I missing. It is a simple frame with one or two pieces of plywood on it. You really should be able to figure this out, but here are a few Wall panel truths to help you out.

1. Do not use staples to hold it together. Yes staples are fast, but long term they make repair difficult.

2. Do not use OSB, it is cheap but you will always have the particle board texture no matter what set it is in. It also makes for a heavy panel

3. Framing does not matter much, build what makes you happy. I like two vertical and three horizontal. I also only skin one side.

4. Build them for your show, I have to put up and tear down my show every year, so I favor lighter panels because of how often they get carried around

5. Make them strong, actors will climb on them- guests will run into them- you will want to use them for years. Do not skimp on materials or quality
I dont think you need to know any more than that unless you have a specific question you are not asking.

scottylmt
07-19-2012, 12:23 PM
Can you please elaborate on making them STRONG? Are you referring to thickness of the plywood here?

Frightener
07-19-2012, 04:22 PM
Try the search bar. I myself have asked this not too long ago and I've seen a few threads since. I'm sure a 10 minute search can have all your answers.

If you ask 10 folks, you'll probably get at least 3 different answers.

Some build 3 horizontal boards and some build with 3 vertical boards.

Some build out of 2x2's with 1/4" luan / underlayment boards (about $11.88 here in my area)

And some use 7/16" / (1/2") OSB board.

Some use 2x3's for the studs and some use 2x4 material.


It's all personal preference I think, *(of course situational as well, is it going to be a wall panel you expect to bounce patrons off of?)

CHEAP is going to be HEAVY! and hard to manhandle by yourself. However, it'll be strong.

EXPENSIVE or anything in the middle will be lighter but can be less strong. I've seen haunts use very lightweight mats like 2x2's and luan and not have problems.

I say build you a jig, make a few panels out of OSB and 2x3's and see if you can handle that. Once you decide that, if you CAN handle it, you may want to think about the lighter weight mats.


Dewayne

scottylmt
07-19-2012, 04:32 PM
That's a great idea. I wouldn't have thought to use different materials based on if ppl will be hitting them.

Allen H
07-19-2012, 05:33 PM
Scottylmt- Building them strong can mean many things, but here are a few tips.
Use more screws than you think you need, like 7 screws across the three short sides and 13 screws down the long sides. If it is in a high traffic area I often put plywood triangles on the non skinned side to strengthen the corners.
Just make sure it feels sturdy, you can go with strong framing or stronger skin, that is up to you.
Allen H

rfsystems
07-19-2012, 09:03 PM
Building wall panels isn't rocket science. The more pressure a person might be likely to put on a panel, the stronger it should be. If you need a wall behind a scene that no one will come in contact with use 1/4 luan, unless you plan on hanging heavy props on it. If you have an area that people are going to be all up on the wall, I'd use 1/2 plywood.

Build smart and don't be lazy.. If you're hesitant about building your wall panels out of 1/2 plywood due to the wieght then you should plan to have help setting them up. Get your plan writen down and figure out how many of what kind of wall panels you need before you start building.

Thanks for the link...

Frightener
07-20-2012, 12:47 AM
rfsystems, we just finished / finalized that very thing ourselves.

In fact, it's coming down to the wire! This is our first year so we had to start from scratch. ZERO wall panels and such. I just got done redesigning my building #2 (part 2 of the haunt, building 3 is maze only) and when I was done, I figured up that I was saving us over $400 in mats and lots of hardwork! I only cutout 2 hallways, that was it believe it or not. Since we're in small (1,000 sq ft) buildings anyways, I figured why waste space on hallways? I still have 1 hallway, but it crucial to our layout / story / setup.

So, also, never hesitate to redo the layout, or to rethink things. I saved a lot of money by doing it this new way and actually, it's going to be easier and I think I'm liking it BETTER than the original.


Allen is right, btw. You'd be totally surprised on how much more sturdy that thing will be with 4 pies on the corners. I've seen 2x2 panels with luan, 3 vert's and I bounced off of it and it was like a BRICK!. Didn't move. I looked at the backsides and it WAS an H, but when I tried to move it, jees.. nah. wasn 't movin! Had one laying on the floor and it felt very solid! much more than I'd figured. So yeah, you have to build smart. When in doubt, SCREW IT SOME MORE! Add pies / triangles, just get to where YOU feel good about it and you're good to go.

Ohh, I also had an impact wall by itself with very little support. This was one of the big fixes I made. Be sure to try and think of everything. Ceiling height, (may have to build wall panels shorter for some reason), impact, lighting, and the "what if's" Just because it's RARE, doesn't mean it WON'T happen.

Looks like you're getting all kinds of help. Post some pics if you can, when you start construction. We likes pics :P


Dewayne

scottylmt
07-20-2012, 10:41 AM
Wow all great advice on how to make walls stronger. In the JB Corn book, I saw he used triangles on every panel that was single sided, so that thought is now implanted! Using more screws i didnt think of (dont know why) Thanks to all of you! Now back to Dewayne's progress thread sorry to jack...

Btw man im loving the look of the carports. Having a continuous haunt that goes inside to outside to inside etc will add a unique dynamic to your haunt! Also can't wait to see why a hallway is crucial to your story line, that sounds cool.

Hell House 666 LLC
07-21-2012, 06:45 PM
You can't build wa;l;s out of triangles guys. They wouldnt fit together.

BrotherMysterio
07-21-2012, 07:23 PM
You can't build wa;l;s out of triangles guys. They wouldnt fit together.

What specific triangles are you referring to?

C.

Allen H
07-22-2012, 12:32 AM
Hell house, wha are you talking about? this is the third odd/stupid/wrong thing you have said in as many posts.

Hell House 666 LLC
07-22-2012, 12:47 AM
ALAN, OBVIOSLY WALL PANELS HAVE TO BE RECTANGLES. HOW ELSE WOULD YOU MAKE A MAZE?

I'VE BUILT PLENTLY OF WALLS. i JUSST NEEDED TO KNOW A BETTER WAY. SORRY NO ONE HERE COULD HELP.

BrotherMysterio
07-22-2012, 12:53 AM
ALAN, OBVIOSLY WALL PANELS HAVE TO BE RECTANGLES. HOW ELSE WOULD YOU MAKE A MAZE?

It is customary to add plywood triangles to the corners of various framing conventions to strengthen and reinforce the usually rectangular frame. The triangles in question usually have an angle break-down of 90-45-45, ergo, they thus fit neatly into corners based on a 90 angle, which, as it happens, most rectangles do.

That's what was being referred to.

C.

Dark Tiki Studios
07-22-2012, 01:08 AM
One method (couldn't find a pic with plywood)

13251

Allen H
07-22-2012, 09:41 AM
"ALAN, OBVIOSLY WALL PANELS HAVE TO BE RECTANGLES. HOW ELSE WOULD YOU MAKE A MAZE?

I'VE BUILT PLENTLY OF WALLS. i JUSST NEEDED TO KNOW A BETTER WAY. SORRY NO ONE HERE COULD HELP."

Hell House, in my post I said "You can use plywood triangles on the non skinned side to strengthen the corners" nothing about that says to build triangular wall panels. My name is my screen name, and I sign most of my posts, take a second and look at who you are addressing and bother to spell the name right.
You're "Sorry no one here could help"? People did help, they tried to help you with an answer to your vague question which could have been easily searched and found an answer for. If ALL the answers posted still have not helped you build a wall panel then you should not build one.
It is obvious that you are VERY new to haunting and the message boards, why not just read them for a few weeks and get a feel for them, try searching for your questions before you ask them, and if you dont understand an answer you were given then ask questions to clarify instead of assuming they were wrong.
Try to be courteous to others by not wasting their time. May I ask how old you are, it might help to clarify some behavior?
Allen H

Greg Chrise
07-22-2012, 12:04 PM
I'm guessing he lives in Virginia, english is not his normal language, spanish is sort of, and even that is messed up because he is deaf and about 34 by now and on drugs. But, that is just a guess. Decorating the front porch of his dad's house is a challenge with help from his uncle, freind next door and maybe grandfather?

And for people in altered conciousnesses like this I AM THE MODERATOR EL SUPREMO and you CAN make a rectangle out of two triangles if they are in the same plane and the length and hypotenuse is larger/greater than the width. It just requires screws that are 48 inches long. Then file the ends off if they stick out anywhere. Do not use power tools for any of this screwing or filing, do it all old school for quality.

Frightener
07-22-2012, 03:27 PM
I'm guessing he lives in Virginia, english is not his normal language, spanish is sort of, and even that is messed up because he is deaf and about 34 by now and on drugs. But, that is just a guess. Decorating the front porch of his dad's house is a challenge with help from his uncle, freind next door and maybe grandfather?

And for people in altered conciousnesses like this I AM THE MODERATOR EL SUPREMO and you CAN make a rectangle out of two triangles if they are in the same plane and the length and hypotenuse is larger/greater than the width. It just requires screws that are 48 inches long. Then file the ends off if they stick out anywhere. Do not use power tools for any of this screwing or filing, do it all old school for quality.

Um... *lip smack lip smack* ... yeup. :D


I lol'd.

rfsystems
07-22-2012, 03:28 PM
You know"Triangles" could make some pretty obscure walls. Definently not what anyone would expect to see. You might have to use a few more braces to hold them up, but could turn out pretty wierd. Maybe I'll try some cardboard models to see what can be done with "Triangles".

scottylmt
07-22-2012, 09:30 PM
Im glad to share that this post at least helped me lol. I didn't catch before that they are PLYWOOD triangles... I assumed metal, and thought damn that might get expensive! Glad I read this post :)

Dark Hill Haunts
07-22-2012, 09:48 PM
JB Corn's book has a lot of excellent info on that and goes into the topic thoroughly. In fact, he tells you how to build an entire haunt from the ground up . . . literally. (His was built on a deck so it could be built over any terrain . . . an ATH: All Terrain Haunt!) I can send you the link to a PDF version if you like. His books are now free and in the public domain.

C.

Would you mind if I can have a link to that file?

BrotherMysterio
07-22-2012, 09:58 PM
You know"Triangles" could make some pretty obscure walls. Definently not what anyone would expect to see. You might have to use a few more braces to hold them up, but could turn out pretty wierd. Maybe I'll try some cardboard models to see what can be done with "Triangles".

Post pics!


Would you mind if I can have a link to that file?

Sent!

Just don't use OSB. Trade that one bit out for some 5mil plywood. A lot lighter, easier to paint, and doesn't soak up moisture like a sponge.

C.

Frightener
07-22-2012, 11:40 PM
I agree. The ONLY reason I'm using OSB is because budget got tight quick! Even the double sided panels are going up one sided, and will be getting the 2nd after it's up.

If this is a success for us, meaning, if it pays next years rent, we'll be doing the rest in all Luan or similar. Our store doesn't have anything labeled "luan", so the only thing I figured was the 1/4 underlayment. Looks exactly the same, may just be different places have different names? Like Masonite, when I went to find masonite for my airbrushing shirt boards, all I found with that name was the siding!

I already had a couple of thousand nails with the airguns, so I'm using nails for the frames for the time being. We're still using 2x3's, but really, they're not THAT much more than the 2x2's here, and 'sides, if you saw our options for the 2x2's you'd laugh. Not a straight board in the bunch. Lowe's or Home Depot in 30 miles both fail to carry a good 2x2.


Dewayne

BrotherMysterio
07-22-2012, 11:45 PM
Not a straight board in the bunch. Lowe's or Home Depot in 30 miles both fail to carry a good 2x2.

An all too common occurrence, regrettably. As for the rest of it, well, work with what you got.

Right now I'm working on a 13 string bass, and I'm using pine to do the proof of concept, cuz that's what I got. As soon as things sort out, I'm going with the good stuff.

C.

Greg Chrise
07-23-2012, 12:04 AM
I have buckets full of 8 inch triangles already painted for back corner support and generally don't even install them until a panel becomes weak or needs a repair.


Nails are still a definite no no. As the panel wiggles around these nails can work their way out and become things for patrons to get cut on as they go by. With screws you can take off a whole piece of lumber and replace it. Some things being not totally square are okay but then you discover some helper did something totally irregular and have to redo it. With screws you can totally redo it. Sometimes you don't find wonky things until you are setting up. Trying to stick this next to that. Even doing everything yourself you become tired and have to deal with #2 and #3 lumber that you think you have bent straight and then screwed in. Again you don't find it until you actually try to set up.

Frightener
07-23-2012, 09:50 AM
Just got back from looking around at the buildings. Actually the last thing we were doing, was we were only using the nailguns to get the panels in place, usually 1 maybe 2 nails, then screwing the rest.

It got to the point my brother was building the panels as I was finishing putting one up, or putting foam up / carving. He was also using mainly screws for the frame, but still using nails for the panel. I think I'm going to go ahead and switch still. I see a LOT of folks still using staples in luan. So I believe I may try a 50/50 with screws and brads. Staples are double and grab and keep from twisting more than a nail. I may pick one up as well, not sure.

Our panels are going together nicely, however, the end walls, and some of the other walls I really don't want to have to repair / replace.


Dewayne

Greg Chrise
07-23-2012, 08:14 PM
Repair or replace sound like words to me. They really mean being able to get crap apart and use some things or throwing broken crap into the land fill because it can't come apart and be repaired easily, then needs to be replaced. Staples do not come apart and I have spent countless hours getting things apart and digging out the little ends of things with vice grips screw drivers, various pliers and pry bars. All this real work has my muscles strong enough to rip my own joints apart if that is somehow impressive but, if it was all screws you can have some of the very same lumber being of service for 30 years.

You would be surprised how much abuse things take. Usually this abuse is in tearing it apart and moving it off season, people dropping it and leaning tons of things on each other. Although not intentional I have dropped panels in tearing the whole thing down and broke the verticle boards right in half. I have had actors beat the sheeting off the lumber and someone has to fix all this stuff.

Staples are great if you are building 5,000 SF really fast and selling it to someone else to worry about the maintenance or disposal. I had one guy that did a lot of that put in a small nail to keep things in place while he lined things up, looks really pro when doing it but again, I'm the idiot that ends up finding these damn nails and figuring out how to get them out of this or that. Screws can generally be gotten out somehow.

In short, just so you know, I said NO!

Greg Chrise
07-23-2012, 08:16 PM
No..........

Greg Chrise
07-23-2012, 08:16 PM
no.........

Greg Chrise
07-23-2012, 08:17 PM
For the love of God, No.

Frightener
07-23-2012, 09:54 PM
I meant "Screws and STAPLES" not brads.

Yeah, we went full screws today. We built about 10 more panels, some double and some single sided, but went all screws.

I did find however, since I started using Luan / underlayment boards that these things, even double sided are about HALF the weight, if not less than, than the osb single sided panels!

That's great and all, but how the heck do you keep these things in place? My other panels are heavy, so they sit well once in place and screwed. Like for instance, when we go to mount up the double luan (lets just call it luan) panels that are double sided, how would you guys mount that? Up until this point, any double sided panels have had their backsides added on last... ie: AFTER screwing the studs together. This is a main wall and shouldn't have to come off until repairs are needed that we did this to, but what about the upcoming wall I have, that may very well need to be moved next year for room arrangement. How do I secure these things to other walls if they're double sided? This haunt WILL NOT be taken down and stored, panels will only be moved when necessary.

SO .. .how about it? Greg? Anyone? I know we don't WANT to have to take a panel off just to get to unscrew a wall panel from the adjacent one... so what then? Do you just use the top brace runners only?


Sorry if my post is jagged. I'm tired. It's 10 pm here and I just got in to eat. Done for the night. Been at it most of the day.

Thanks.

Dewayne

rfsystems
07-23-2012, 10:14 PM
There are may options to connect double sided panels... You can can do metal plates that screw to the face of of the panels, you can move the bottom piece of wood up the panel and shorten up the side pieces so you can slide the bottom of the plywood over a long 2x4 (the length of 2 or more panels, depending on the length of your wall) Or you can just screw a board base board to the face of multiple panels. Connecting multiple panel can be simple or very complex depending on your design. If you're looking for something quick and easy, Lowes and Home Depot stock flat metal plates with pre-drilled holes in their framing bracket section. (ask the store employee where the joist hangers are)

Hope this helps...

Greg Chrise
07-23-2012, 10:43 PM
Yep, metal predrilled pieces, Simpson Strong Tie brand name at Home Depot or Lowes. An A-21 for anything angled and an A-33 0r A-35? For flat. Each one with 4 screws holds up to 175 pounds in a huricane. It is best to have them 2 on each side of every joint. Or some people make their own from random metal sheeting. Punching holes. They used to be cheap.

The baseboard and one on the top works too but metal is better, overall cheaper. You just touch up paint after construction is over. If they still move around because they are too light and you are outside, it is rebar pounded into the ground and electrical clamp time.

Frightener
07-23-2012, 10:50 PM
Yeah, I thot of those in the shower. I guess paired with the running boards on top they should be fine. Plus, it's all up to the design, right? lol. Just make sure those aren't impact panels.


Thanks,

Dewayne

Greg Chrise
07-23-2012, 11:12 PM
Which ever way you adopt, you do it all the same so there is no fancy figuring out how to take it apart later. Not sure why I'm thinking you need auto air bag deployment systems? That would be a scare!

ravensmoon
07-27-2012, 06:37 PM
I have always used 3 vertical 2x3 at 93"L and an additional 2x3 top and bottom at 48"L. I covered both sides with 7/16 OSB, smoother side out. I glued the OSB to the 2x3 with Gorilla glue(spray some water from a old windex bottle on the glue before you lay the OSB down as that's what Gorrilla glue reacts with so you get a really good bond). Add 3 to 5 1" staples down each 2x3 to hold it until it cures.

Here's the important part. Overhang your OSB panel by 1/2 inch to the left or right when you glue it down, that is don't line it up perfectly over the 2x3's. Pay attention that both sides of the panel overhang the same side and make sure it is consistent throughout all of your panels. I just ripped a 2 1/2" wide piece of the OSB and used it a a template on the side of the 2x3 and lined up the edge of the 2x8 OSB on that.

What you get is a LEGO effect where each panel slides into the next which creates a VERY strong wall and prevents and light coming from the next room.

To connect the panels together, I used a Simpson 4x4 half base at the bottom and a Simpson tie plate at the top. You just slide it in half way in so that it straddles the joint. Slide the next panel in and use 1 1/4 drywall screws to hold it in place. Do not put any screws in until both panels are in place as it will squeeze the 4x4 half base together and make it harder to slide the next panel together. screw the tie plate onto the top and you are done. Make sure you screw into the 2x3 and not just into the OSB.

Where you have 2 walls intercept, use a T strap at the top instead of the straight one, and 2 Simpson framing angles at the bottom.

You can use OSB, Luan or Playwood depending on budget, but the OSB is very heavy and helps create additional stability because it is so massive...and its the least expensive. Most haunts are fairly dark inside and wasting money on smooth walls could be better spent on getting people to focus their attention elsewhere in the room, say like a severed head ;-)

BrotherMysterio
07-27-2012, 10:17 PM
I have always used 3 vertical 2x3 at 93"L and an additional 2x3 top and bottom at 48"L. I covered both sides with 7/16 OSB, smoother side out. I glued the OSB to the 2x3 with Gorilla glue(spray some water from a old windex bottle on the glue before you lay the OSB down as that's what Gorrilla glue reacts with so you get a really good bond). Add 3 to 5 1" staples down each 2x3 to hold it until it cures.

Here's the important part. Overhang your OSB panel by 1/2 inch to the left or right when you glue it down, that is don't line it up perfectly over the 2x3's. Pay attention that both sides of the panel overhang the same side and make sure it is consistent throughout all of your panels. I just ripped a 2 1/2" wide piece of the OSB and used it a a template on the side of the 2x3 and lined up the edge of the 2x8 OSB on that.

What you get is a LEGO effect where each panel slides into the next which creates a VERY strong wall and prevents and light coming from the next room.

To connect the panels together, I used a Simpson 4x4 half base at the bottom and a Simpson tie plate at the top. You just slide it in half way in so that it straddles the joint. Slide the next panel in and use 1 1/4 drywall screws to hold it in place. Do not put any screws in until both panels are in place as it will squeeze the 4x4 half base together and make it harder to slide the next panel together. screw the tie plate onto the top and you are done. Make sure you screw into the 2x3 and not just into the OSB.

Where you have 2 walls intercept, use a T strap at the top instead of the straight one, and 2 Simpson framing angles at the bottom.

You can use OSB, Luan or Playwood depending on budget, but the OSB is very heavy and helps create additional stability because it is so massive...and its the least expensive. Most haunts are fairly dark inside and wasting money on smooth walls could be better spent on getting people to focus their attention elsewhere in the room, say like a severed head ;-)

Excellent treatment of the subject! Thank you for your contribution and welcome to the forums! I'm sure you'll fit right in.

(Don't know if that's a good thing, as we're all a bit crazy here, but we like to call this place home.)

:D

C.

Frightener
07-28-2012, 01:54 AM
Awesome! I saved the post for later. I think it's a little late for us, seeing as to how we are probably at the halfway point of wall panels, with the exception of our end walls which should be semi-perm. walls.


Thanks for the great info!


Dewayne

scottylmt
07-28-2012, 03:08 PM
Yes that was a very detailed description. Thanks! The second half I had to re read simply because I haven't heard some of those terms before lol. But it definitely sounds stable your way!

Frightener
07-29-2012, 10:34 AM
Had to come back to the thread to double check something. I could've SWORN that you said 94", lol. I was thinking.. um.. that's not lining up.

Anyways, just thought I'd let you know we're implementing your wall scheme for our end caps. We're building a solid wall and making a door in another section of the building. The three vert's with OSB should be much stronger than the other setup for an exterior wall.

Thanks again.


Dewayne

Creepy Works
07-29-2012, 01:15 PM
I made a frame outta 2x4's laying flat. 2 vertical 8' boards with 3 horizontals that are 41" long each. The horizontals placed at the top, bottom, and center. The OSB is shifted 1 3/4" so that way it creates a tongue and groove effect. I used something like 64 sheetrock screws per panel(double sided). It is a slow process to build one but I always looked at it as I could take it apart easily and reuse the material else where if needed. Stick 3 screws on each side of the joint and its pretty stout. Run a short brace at the top of the panel in the corners and it is pretty dang strong. The weight of the panels keep them from moving around on the concrete. I also made a bunch of corner pieces so I could easily change direction of the wall. If you paint make sure to use oil base primer/paint on the first coat to help keep the osb from peeling.

Frightener
07-29-2012, 01:27 PM
Creepy, yeah the oil based thing I heard before. The thing is, my stuff should be covered in tin after the season. So I only need my paint to protect for a few months. Maybe 7 months or so, depends on how soon the cold gets here. If it's freezing I'll wait till it warms up... unless of course my boards are bad, then I'll tuff it out in the cold.


Dewayne

ravensmoon
07-29-2012, 04:47 PM
Had to come back to the thread to double check something. I could've SWORN that you said 94", lol. I was thinking.. um.. that's not lining up.

Anyways, just thought I'd let you know we're implementing your wall scheme for our end caps. We're building a solid wall and making a door in another section of the building. The three vert's with OSB should be much stronger than the other setup for an exterior wall.

Thanks again.


Dewayne

After rereading that I can see where it can get confusion. Here is a drawing of the panel layout and links to the strong ties.

The BC40 is the one you want which is for a standard 4"x4" post and the easiest to find.
http://www.strongtie.com/ftp/catalogs/c-can12/c-can12-p063.pdf

Anything longer than 6" works fine for the top plate

http://www.strongtie.com/products/connectors/ltp4-ltp5-a34-a35.asp

Frightener
07-29-2012, 05:24 PM
Hey, thanks for the links. No the confusion was on me. I really thought you said to make them 94". lol. I was like.. ehhh what? So I went back and looked. I was wrong.


The links help a lot. I already got some brackets like you posted, but just a little different I think They're 4" long and not 6", but I'm wanting to use 3 anyways per 90* wall. I don't have many 90* anymore since I cut out 90% of the hallways to make bigger rooms.


Dewayne

BrotherMysterio
08-12-2012, 11:14 PM
You can't build wa;l;s out of triangles guys. They wouldnt fit together.

Does anyone know what happened to the OP? Haven't seen him around recently. Things were starting to get entertaining.

C.

rfsystems
08-13-2012, 05:26 AM
Haven't seen any new posts from OP in a while..