PDA

View Full Version : "Moving" Floor Tiles and Hallways...



Jennifer Kem
11-13-2012, 09:58 PM
I was curious about attempting to make a hallway, or partial hallway consisting of floor tiles that seem to move when stepped on... I'm not talking the see-saw motion like some fun houses have at carnivals... I mean the kind that slide sideways when foot pressure is placed on them. We were trying to come up with possible options for construction... A box consisting of ball bearings supporting a board on top slightly smaller than the box, a similar effect but using castors, etc... Any ideas that you guys may have, or hints, tips, or even methods you have used yourself, and feel like sharing, would definitely be helpful!

My boyfriend and I just finished our first season working at a haunt, and having basically taken over and built most of our booth, and apparently having done well enough to be given our own booth for next year, we're looking for ideas that are different from the other areas of our haunt. We are still complete newbs when it comes to how to build, although we have been trying to think ahead when it comes to safety, durability, and actual function.

Thanks in advance for any help!

Jen

Jim Warfield
11-14-2012, 12:28 AM
Short people versus tall ones... moving something under someone's feet can have a profoundly different effect on unsteady, clumbsy people versus those who are not that way.
Short people's butts hit the ground quicker, maybe not harming them as much. Move a section of underfoot floor just 3 inches sideways and a tall person might fall down hard and quick. Coordination is never a "given" factor with any body type or age of the person.
If someone is standing still and the floor moves slightly, maybe nothing happens. If the floor happens to move under the foot that is almost touching the ground as they step or walk a serious fall could maybe happen?
Lay a roller skate at a 90 degree angle to your foor, then step on it. Now imagine doing that and you don't realize the skate is there waiting for you.
Other moving things in a haunted house only have move just ever so slightly and the customer's reaction will be ten times extreme as compared to that same person at home, relaxed. OF course the dark and strangeness surrounding also adds to this factor.
Design and build anticipating the stupidest, unluckiest person coming through as a customer... then hope and pray they don't.
Keep the staggering, screaming drunks OUT and your life will be much less complicated.

Moxley Manor
11-14-2012, 07:41 AM
Fright props carries these if you have the money to spend on them.

http://www.frightprops.com/fear-floor-tiles.html

Jennifer Kem
11-14-2012, 02:31 PM
Short people versus tall ones... moving something under someone's feet can have a profoundly different effect on unsteady, clumbsy people versus those who are not that way.
Short people's butts hit the ground quicker, maybe not harming them as much. Move a section of underfoot floor just 3 inches sideways and a tall person might fall down hard and quick. Coordination is never a "given" factor with any body type or age of the person.
If someone is standing still and the floor moves slightly, maybe nothing happens. If the floor happens to move under the foot that is almost touching the ground as they step or walk a serious fall could maybe happen?
Lay a roller skate at a 90 degree angle to your foor, then step on it. Now imagine doing that and you don't realize the skate is there waiting for you.
Other moving things in a haunted house only have move just ever so slightly and the customer's reaction will be ten times extreme as compared to that same person at home, relaxed. OF course the dark and strangeness surrounding also adds to this factor.
Design and build anticipating the stupidest, unluckiest person coming through as a customer... then hope and pray they don't.
Keep the staggering, screaming drunks OUT and your life will be much less complicated.

Being 6'1" (tall family), and semi clumsy myself at times, I understand the possible problems something like this could cause. A couple years ago the big thing around this area at haunted houses seemed to be this little false bit of ground, where a spring metal mattress was partially hidden for people to step on, when coming out of a doorway or wherever.... Having a bad knee, and suddenly stepping down further than expected HURTS... I definitely understand where you are coming from.

This is an idea, one of many we are working through to find ideas that will work best for us next year... We're pretty new at this, and do not yet know what does or does not work in the haunt world. I want our area to be as safe as possible, but I'm exploring different ideas.. I do still want to understand how these tiles work though... Whether we'd ever use them, I don't know. But understanding them may give us other ideas to use... Maybe using them on the walls, or coming up with an alternative...

Blade-of-the-moon
11-14-2012, 05:45 PM
I like the idea of moving floors myself just not 100% sure about using them. I kind of like effects where it's seems things are moving but aren't. Like vortex tunnels and some light projection can make a floor look unsteady in the dark as people are looking at only the light. The light moves , to them the floor moves. Maybe just adding something that makes a nice vibration would be more than enough coupled with such a light.

I also like the idea of having floors angled while the rest of the room isn't. makes them feel really off balance. :)

dreadland
11-15-2012, 06:34 PM
we built a hallway with ramps on both sides we then put a piece of plywood down on top of tire tubes it was amazing scare the plywood inside had rubber down the pinch point of the design we intergrated air horns but it was only 2ft wide 8 ft long restriction in some states dont allow this type of tight spaces

Jennifer Kem
11-15-2012, 08:30 PM
I do like the idea of movement under their feet. Not enough to cause anyone to fall (even though no matter what it will happen), but I love the idea of the effect it could add...

Being the first year we've done a haunt, it was amazingly entertaining to witness the SIMPLEST things that people were afraid of... How that change of mindset just from being in a haunted house caused confusion and fear of just about everything.. :rolleyes:

BrotherMysterio
11-15-2012, 11:54 PM
I do like the idea of movement under their feet. Not enough to cause anyone to fall (even though no matter what it will happen), but I love the idea of the effect it could add...

Being the first year we've done a haunt, it was amazingly entertaining to witness the SIMPLEST things that people were afraid of... How that change of mindset just from being in a haunted house caused confusion and fear of just about everything.. :rolleyes:

An easy funhouse effect that provides stable footing yet allows for that sudden, uncertain movement, is to have a hanging floor, which essentially is a suspended bridge effect, where there is a 4' x 8' section, or 4' x 12' section, of floor that is suspended from framework doubling as handrails, where the whole section can move and shift a few inches in any direction. The patrons have handrails to hold onto, and both feet are firmly planted on the same patch of floor, yet they are still experiencing the extreme wobble and shiftiness of being on that floor.

I've been on one before. Believe me, if you don't know what's coming, it's very scary indeed, and it's free to build, being that you are just using the basic materials you'd be using to build that part of the haunt anyway, apart from some chain and cheap hardware to go with it. Iow, it figures into the base cost of the house, with no $600 sections of tile to buy and so on.

Another option is the classic wobble floor, but the above hanging floor will get you closer to what you said you wanted.

C.

BrotherMysterio
11-16-2012, 12:23 AM
Or you could also do this . . .

6dQVSR6sGYY

C.

Blade-of-the-moon
11-16-2012, 10:38 AM
Hmm..both are really cool ideas. And easier than some of the stuff we've done in the past. One year we did a moving floor with a mattress under it. Just added a sheet of braced plywood over it and had the corners hidden under a lip of wood ringed in vinyl. Worked pretty good for one person at a time.

You could probably add a transducer and get the vibrating floor as well.

The bridge..does it work as well if more than one person is on it at a time ? I seem recall it won't move as much. Would a two or more small bridges work better than a big bridge ?

Since we're on Funhouse gags, I love the blast of air from the floor one..really gets a lot of people..especially that one person that is so scared they keep looking down.. lol

BrotherMysterio
11-16-2012, 11:37 AM
Hmm..both are really cool ideas. And easier than some of the stuff we've done in the past. One year we did a moving floor with a mattress under it. Just added a sheet of braced plywood over it and had the corners hidden under a lip of wood ringed in vinyl. Worked pretty good for one person at a time.

Good option.


The bridge..does it work as well if more than one person is on it at a time ? I seem recall it won't move as much. Would a two or more small bridges work better than a big bridge?

As with all things, YMMV. If it works better with a 12' section, do a 12' section. If 8', do 8'. What you mainly want is a stable footing. If you had a 4' section, that could be the middle of a pace for someone, where they step onto it with one foot, and off of it with the other, where they only have the one foot making contact, which would create that potential for slipping and falling. It doesn't have to move too much. Just a few inches in any given direction is more than enough.


Since we're on Funhouse gags, I love the blast of air from the floor one..really gets a lot of people..especially that one person that is so scared they keep looking down.. lol

It would be great to have a thread or even a subforum dedicated to funhouse effects. Again, usually cheap or free, since the cost is absorbed by the base cost of building the haunt in the first place.

C.

Jennifer Kem
11-16-2012, 03:25 PM
I do like the idea of the suspended floor, although we do have a bridge on the trail that has a similar effect... Maybe we can somehow incorporate it and keep it different enough that it wouldn't just be a repeat...

Blade-of-the-moon
11-16-2012, 07:51 PM
If hidden well enough Jennifer they'd have no idea it was even close to the same thing. Patrons experience effects but rarely in my experience do they notice when it's the same..unless it's visual.

Might give the suspended bridge, vibrating floor a go next year. It really only needs to be a foot above the ground or so if that much to move and shift. Add some shingles or something to it for better traction to reduce slipping.

What about using transducers to make the floor vibrate ?

BrotherMysterio
11-16-2012, 10:37 PM
I do like the idea of the suspended floor, although we do have a bridge on the trail that has a similar effect... Maybe we can somehow incorporate it and keep it different enough that it wouldn't just be a repeat...


If hidden well enough Jennifer they'd have no idea it was even close to the same thing. Patrons experience effects but rarely in my experience do they notice when it's the same..unless it's visual.

Might give the suspended bridge, vibrating floor a go next year. It really only needs to be a foot above the ground or so if that much to move and shift. Add some shingles or something to it for better traction to reduce slipping.

What about using transducers to make the floor vibrate ?

Or do a rope bridge with planking in the middle, so there is a wide enough path for ADA and building code compliance, but that would still feel claustrophobic and unstable. Also, no scaring on the bridge. That can create issues and it's just not needed.

C.

Adam Calhoun
11-17-2012, 01:52 AM
Could attempt to build a "frame" much like a wall frame, but have the edges set higher. Then fille the frame holes, or dead space with golf balls, then place a sheet of plywood cut to fit within the frame, I included a mockup made in Paint.. Nothing special, ill see if I can upload something better, hopefully you get the idea.

The Black would represent the raised edges of the frame, (put a sheet of plywood on bottom side as well), the red would represent some 2x'4s cut to length, and maybe use 2x2 pieces as the cross bars within the frame to seperate spaces of golf balls. It'd give the same effect, and would cost about... $25 at most, maybe less i you already had some plywood to use on it.Could then try somehow attaching handrails or building handrails maybe that somehow run off the wall or some better way to fit regulations. Anyway, I made one of these myself and it works great, Ive used it in home haunts, but as I will be moving to the Commercial Haunt level for the 2013 season. If you have any questions about this just ask!

14138

Jennifer Kem
11-17-2012, 12:52 PM
Could attempt to build a "frame" much like a wall frame, but have the edges set higher. Then fille the frame holes, or dead space with golf balls, then place a sheet of plywood cut to fit within the frame, I included a mockup made in Paint.. Nothing special, ill see if I can upload something better, hopefully you get the idea.

The Black would represent the raised edges of the frame, (put a sheet of plywood on bottom side as well), the red would represent some 2x'4s cut to length, and maybe use 2x2 pieces as the cross bars within the frame to seperate spaces of golf balls. It'd give the same effect, and would cost about... $25 at most, maybe less i you already had some plywood to use on it.Could then try somehow attaching handrails or building handrails maybe that somehow run off the wall or some better way to fit regulations. Anyway, I made one of these myself and it works great, Ive used it in home haunts, but as I will be moving to the Commercial Haunt level for the 2013 season. If you have any questions about this just ask!

14138

This is actually very similar to how we were thinking about going about making these. Having a maybe 1x2 "lip" on top around the edge to keep the plywood that moves in place... Do the golf balls work well enough? With both rolling, and weight if more than one person was stepping on that spot at once... My boyfriend was thinking about different options, like castors on the plywood itself, or ball bearings. etc.

BrotherMysterio
11-17-2012, 02:13 PM
My boyfriend was thinking about different options, like castors on the plywood itself, or ball bearings. etc.

Same principle as the golf balls. This is an excellent design. The handrails wouldn't need to be load bearing; just stabilizing.

The advantage of the golf balls is that they are easily available, and virtually free. Pretty much any thrift store setting, or perhaps dead balls from a golf driving range, and so on, that would work. The golf balls should be enough if you have enough of them. If you have enough balls, you should get enough weight distribution to make it work. The holes that hold the golf balls should be big enough so that the golf balls can freely move around an inch or so so that they can get the whole floor section moving. Test the design out small scale. YMMV.

C.

Adam Calhoun
11-17-2012, 03:58 PM
as for the "lip" I just used a 2x4 . So basically the frame made with 2x4's on there side(taller), then the red lines along the EDGE would be 2x4 laid flat and use 2x2's as your crossing section, with the 2x4 laid flat again down the middle. This would allow your Golf Balls to roll freely, it'd be like racking a pool table but taking out 1 or two of the balls in it, they would move freely like that, but not so few as to it not being able to support the wood on top. I will get you a picture of this tomorrow and send it to you, please PM me your email. :)

BrotherMysterio
11-17-2012, 04:52 PM
I will get you a picture of this tomorrow and send it to you, please PM me your email. :)

Or you could post it so we cold all benefit from it! :D I would definitely love to see it.

C.

Adam Calhoun
11-17-2012, 06:03 PM
Sounds good, I will definitely do that

Blade-of-the-moon
11-17-2012, 06:04 PM
Or you could post it so we cold all benefit from it! :D I would definitely love to see it.

C.

Righto ! :grin:

Adam Calhoun
11-19-2012, 06:00 PM
Ok guys, sorry this took so long. I didnt realize that i'd already had this stuff send to Louisiana for a Haunt im building down there for next year. Anyways, Moral of the story, I didnt have the real one here. But I DID however Make you guys one in Microsoft Paint. I think it turned out really well, and it gives you a more visual concept. I put some details along with some measurements but of course you guys can make it however you wish. Anyways, Enjoy this and please let me know what you think! Obviously your more than welcome to make one of these, but please dont steal credit for my awesome Pic/ Plans :D



14164

Jennifer Kem
11-19-2012, 09:24 PM
Thank you! That definitely gives me a better idea of how it's done!

BrotherMysterio
11-20-2012, 12:44 AM
Thank you! That definitely gives me a better idea of how it's done!

I am soooo diggin' into this one!

C.

Adam Calhoun
11-20-2012, 03:08 AM
Glad you guys like it, If I can help you anymore, ill do my best, just let me know!

Jim Warfield
11-20-2012, 09:07 AM
A trip-hazard in the 2 by 4s laying there with such deep edges? Some customers can trip on a mere shadow, and do!
Tolerences should be maintained (and created) by using something much thinner and more durable, like steel, which would require drilling and welding skills.(and tools)
An optical illusion over or near a flat, smooth floor surface can make people wobble or stagger, yet no 2 by 4 edges await their tailbone or chin.
Think and build assuming the world's unluckiest, clumbsiest customer will be coming through you place, then do your best and hope like hell they don't find their way to your door.
Keep the staggering, screaming drunks OUT completely and you will also see much better luck and SO many fewer problems.

Adam Calhoun
11-20-2012, 09:15 AM
Clearly this is just a model not a blueprint Jim. If you leave a 2x4 sitting out of nowhere then well you probably shouldnt be building things and should hire a contractor. This was just to show a simple method of this. Build ramps etc as you want on either side and it will fix that problem just fine. I made this model using microsoft PAINT so its not to scale. If your worried about a lip on the inside then use a thicker plywood or 2 sheets of it together to make up that "2 inches". Its a non issue, we've never had ANY problems with tripping. Obviously I dont leave a random 4x8 of prop just laying on the floor in the dark.

Jim Warfield
11-20-2012, 10:52 AM
It looked to me in a video shown here that it was constructed with heavy lips (trips)? 2 by 4 's , ex cetra. You illustrated a "simple method" which could be mistaken for an actual workable plan by some, since the "KISS" methodology is so oftern used="Keep It Simple, Stupid"
Darn those dark fuzzy videos?
I CAN BE WRONG! I freely and often admit. ( rare commodity, I know, but the right way to be.)

Adam Calhoun
11-20-2012, 03:21 PM
Sorry I hadnt seen any videos :( , If your talking about the FProps vidoes on this subject, those ive seen. Just thought those looked... well Not for me. haha. :)

Jim Warfield
11-21-2012, 11:30 AM
In the belly of a semi trailer haunt going down the road at 60 MPH would be my kind of scary moving floor!

sysasi
11-21-2012, 06:53 PM
I have read of using the same concept with tennis balls so that there is some sponginess to it as well. Another technique that I have read was to cut a noodle into equal chunks and place them under a floor so that the floor is spongy. I have not tried either of these myself. We have made ramps with plywood with just enough support to be safe but enough give to flex and even that freaks people out.