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Skeered
11-16-2012, 03:17 PM
Looking to put up a brick facade 16'-18' in height and about 125'-150' in length.

Pink foam is my first choice because of price, weight, and I can work with it to make it however I wanted to look. Downside is my facade will be up all year. 100 degrees in the summer and low 20's during the winter. Don't want it to blow away in the wind either. I also would have to figure out how I would want to mount it as well.

Any ideas cause faux brick panels cost money and finding enough used or surplus brick may be a problem as well.

screamforadream
11-16-2012, 03:25 PM
Shane, Graystone on here, turned me onto this cool brick paneling from Lowes.

It's not too expensive, in fact, if you compare it with the final costs of time/labor/paint/hard coating of doing the brick into pink foam, it's about the same in price. And if you buy a LOT you can get some pretty nifty discounts. And it looks INCREDIBLE!

Oh and they're sold in 4x8 sheets, and are VERY sturdy.

Moxley Manor
11-16-2012, 03:53 PM
Looking to put up a brick facade 16'-18' in height and about 125'-150' in length.

Pink foam is my first choice because of price, weight, and I can work with it to make it however I wanted to look. Downside is my facade will be up all year. 100 degrees in the summer and low 20's during the winter. Don't want it to blow away in the wind either. I also would have to figure out how I would want to mount it as well.

Any ideas cause faux brick panels cost money and finding enough used or surplus brick may be a problem as well.

Try this from Home Depot.
http://www.homedepot.com/buy/4-ft-x-8-ft-decorative-gaslight-brick-panel-103735.html#.UKbDdX1MHMI

Skeered
11-16-2012, 05:51 PM
Yeah. Those gaslight panels are only $26 a sheet versus $8.5 for a sheet of pink foam. They also had wood fibers on the back so maybe not completely water resistant if water hits the backside. A guy I know has a cnc router. Thought I would let him route out all the mortar grooves on pink foam and I would distress, heat gun it, and paint them. Still doesn't help though with them being flimsy and vulnerable as they are though. I'll have to look around more to see if I can find some of those panels at a better rate and go from there...

Deathwing
11-16-2012, 06:10 PM
The brick panels from Lowes are nice but too clean looking as is so you'd have to paint them up a little to age them. Also they are not meant for outdoor use once they get wet they will buckle.


Jake

Deathwing
11-16-2012, 06:12 PM
If using foam you'd still need a wood base at least and then the foam so that will add costs. The foam will need to be hard coated which is costly too.

Jake

screamforadream
11-16-2012, 06:27 PM
Latex paint the whole backside and any other exposed wood surface, will help make it weather resistant. They are clean, but that's what haunter creativity is for, water down some ugly paint and go hard!!

Front Yard Fright
11-16-2012, 08:24 PM
I think pink foam may be the best bet for you. If done correctly, it can look quite convincing as well as hold up to the elements providing you seal/protect it correctly.

Skeered
11-16-2012, 10:29 PM
I did a 8x12 10'tall "brick room" in my haunt this year. I routered out all the brick lines, heat gunned it which hardened it, sprayed it with gray paint for the mortar grooves, then rolled on some red. Looked extremely nice and pretty tough.

Whether I attach something directly to the building or set up poles against the building I am going to lathe it every 2' horizontally and 4' vertically. Maybe even block it every 2' vertically. Haven't got that far yet.

What I wonder is how well the pink foam will hold up with 100 degree heat beating on it all day during the summer?

Jim Warfield
11-17-2012, 02:18 AM
About 6 large pick up truck loads of antique, soft, illregular bricks for $100.oo
They look "OLD, because they ARE! Saves time and money trying to make them look old, and they WILL take 100 degree heat!
Bags of mortar have gotten cheaper around here at least. Customers will be impressed.
OF course the easy way to impress them is to just have the real bricks installed at locations where they will be close to them and use the brick paneling for the further away locations.
The ancient bricks I have are identicle to the bricks used in New Orleans on those above ground tombs.
It is fun building a plywood and 2by 4 arch, laying the bricks up over it, then removing the plywood and WOW! Look at the nice real brick arch!

zombietoxin
11-17-2012, 09:00 AM
Looking to put up a brick facade 16'-18' in height and about 125'-150' in length.

Pink foam is my first choice because of price, weight, and I can work with it to make it however I wanted to look. Downside is my facade will be up all year. 100 degrees in the summer and low 20's during the winter. Don't want it to blow away in the wind either. I also would have to figure out how I would want to mount it as well.

Any ideas cause faux brick panels cost money and finding enough used or surplus brick may be a problem as well.


IMO, you're asking for a LOT here if you want it to last a long time- and why do it if you can't get your money's worth out of it?. I'm going out on a limb here and say that faux panels AND foam is going to fail you in the end if you think is can be accomplished on the cheap side.

Even if you already had a solid backing to stick the foam to, it would still have to be hard coated in some way. If you just paint it, you'll either have to put up with an ever growing number of pink spots showing up, or be willing to repaint it yearly- and touch-ups look just that- like a touch-up. You'll be working for the wall, instead of the other way around...

An 18' high x 150' long, real brick wall?! Jeebus!

Greg Chrise
11-17-2012, 12:23 PM
Everyone throws this word hard coat out there and I have no idea what they are talking about. Foam and the paint you put over it will put up with 100 degrees as long as the stucture inderneath isn't wobbling around in the wind all the time. Just look at any modern construction and they are going 30 and 40 foot high with metal studs, then 1/2 inch or 7/16 OSB, a layer of barrier cloth then white styrofoam and then stucco base coat, stucco texture finish an done. A serious number of anchors are shot through the foam and I have done mobile facades from pink foam that end up being 24 foot by 80. They are now more than 6 years old and stored outside in the open when not on location. Touching them up from handling and totally repainting them every couple years was in the plan.

The act of freshening up paint jobs is like a performance art that "they are getting ready" and advertsing in a way. Seeing activity, it is going to be on this year.

Just doing the heat gun hardens the surface. Now we do add cement formulas and additives rather than just water to provide a texture then paint, antique and final clear all in exterior grade acrylics. To make it last is simple, you have to use $50 a gallon paint instead of $25 per gallon paint even for the watered down washes. Do you want to paint every year or have the thing peel off and be unsightly or would you like to go about 5 years with out messing with it. That's the real difference. I seem to keep getting work because the old work still "sells" and I don't have to advertise or anything. If it was crap I think I would have been out of that game 18 years ago. The do it yourselfer doesn't get to see what happens over time, they only think about expense at that moment in time.

Applying hard coats can be tricky and can delaminate as well so less is better. You have to adhere it to the panel with lots and lots of glue and possibly base coat the OSB on both sides before applying anything for it to last. Other fascades we have done are use mobile but are seriously heavy 3/4 plywood and 2 by 6 structures and usually some corner gets knocked off of the concrete over lay with a fork truck moving it around or almost dropping it. The styrofoam units can be assembled on the ground and a bunch of people stand it up and anchor it over large windows with heavy metal frames and bang, an architecual design from the 60s becomes haunted mansion in half a day. It is also located in tornado alley and is still being used.

No, there are no pictures, I just do stuff.

Dreamreaper
11-18-2012, 10:08 AM
14144If you have the plywood up or even better would be hardibacker attached to the wood frame. So if its plywood you need a moisture barrier then attach chicken wire or there is stucco wire with moisture backing already on it, staple it up well to the plywood and do a thin layer of type s mortar to cover the wire let dry and tape off the 4x8 brick pattern with 1/2 inch fiber reinforced tape if you can't find it I keep it in stock, now after its all taped off mix up more type s mortar and add in terracotta color you can find it at Home Depot in dry or liquid then do a thin layer over the whole wall and if you want a old brick look slap some white and black paint all over it randomly then pull off all the tape leaving the new brick look and you can seal it to make it last longer if you would like. if you use hardi or wonder board you don't need the wire but tape the seams with the fiberglass drywall tape and then the first thin layer over that. Any questions just ask i do this also for my work www.icoatproducts.com I have the tape and sealers if you cant find them. I also have facebook pages under Ken Lavender. sorry photo is sideways.

Greg Chrise
11-18-2012, 01:51 PM
Ken, do you have a source for 3/4 inch reinforced tape? We have been reduced to doing 3/4 inch masking tape then layering 1/2 over that for a pattern.

Thanks, Greg.

Allen H
11-18-2012, 06:43 PM
I am one opinion of many, but I would do it in foam. It would not be cheap, but it will look better than brick board. I would carve the mortar lines with a soldering iron, heat gun it for texture, then use acrylic stucco (shot from a hopper) to coat it, and then detail paint the bricks. I am in Dallas TX and used the same techniques on white foam for my castle and it looks great after seven years.
Allen H

Dreamreaper
11-18-2012, 06:51 PM
Ken, do you have a source for 3/4 inch reinforced tape? We have been reduced to doing 3/4 inch masking tape then layering 1/2 over that for a pattern.

Thanks, Greg.
Greg, I sell it. I have 3/4 1/2 3/8 1/4 and 1/8 fiberglass re enforced tape. My # 530-945-5125

Greg Chrise
11-18-2012, 07:03 PM
Cool. I had to buy tons of 1/2 inch at a time. I'm writing down your number.

Skeered
11-18-2012, 08:33 PM
I am one opinion of many, but I would do it in foam. It would not be cheap, but it will look better than brick board. I would carve the mortar lines with a soldering iron, heat gun it for texture, then use acrylic stucco (shot from a hopper) to coat it, and then detail paint the bricks. I am in Dallas TX and used the same techniques on white foam for my castle and it looks great after seven years.
Allen H

When you say you would do it in foam you are referring to just white foam as in your case correct? What kind of paint did you use on everything?

Allen H
11-18-2012, 08:48 PM
Id use pinkfoam. and exterior paint. That is about it.

Moxley Manor
11-19-2012, 08:34 AM
I am one opinion of many, but I would do it in foam. It would not be cheap, but it will look better than brick board. I would carve the mortar lines with a soldering iron, heat gun it for texture, then use acrylic stucco (shot from a hopper) to coat it, and then detail paint the bricks. I am in Dallas TX and used the same techniques on white foam for my castle and it looks great after seven years.
Allen H

Where do you get your foam? I am building an indoor facade after our Christmas event and was planning on using the foam carving technique. This is all new to me and I am just going off of what I have seen on youtube so wish me luck.

Dreamreaper
11-19-2012, 08:39 AM
1415014151 I have Many things outside made from all types of foam and they all have to be touched up before October. A brick wall that size may be a pain with foam. I have things I have done with what I described in recent post that is over 15 years old and looks as good as the day I did it. GOOD LUCK

Skeered
11-19-2012, 09:24 AM
Id use pinkfoam. and exterior paint. That is about it.


I was asking which foam you were referring to cause you mentioned using acylic stucco as well. I figured just heat gun the stuff and paint would be about it. I don't expect it to last forever. As long as I can get a few years out of it with maybe a little touching up if needed.

Greg Chrise
11-19-2012, 09:37 AM
I could but wouldn't want to do a brick pattern on ladders and scaffolding. Very time consuming. With the foam you are sort of putting the pattern up there quickly and maybe doing some seams. All of the up in the air stuff isn't in contact with people or things like a floor or concrete deck would be. Or like something that gets moved around seasonally. I would do it in pink foam as it is more dense and reacts nice to the heat gun. Perhaps a larger block pattern like a castle could be white foam.

Someone was making vacuform panels that looked pretty good but they were just as much as if you hand made the bricks any other way then additionally needed to be painted and detailed. Putting a full stucco base coat and brick design adds lots of weight to the structure so you are increasing costs by having to frame everything in 2x6 or metal. I don't think the vacuform people lasted or couldn't provide product. They were like $180 non painted and $260 painted. That's like $8 per square foot and even as a contractor, we do brick patterns depending on size fo $4 to $6 per Square foot. Maybe it would get into $8 if we had to travel and install on location.

Most facades we have built in the shop then installed and antiqued on location, or torn down an existing facade and layed it out on location, added to it on the ground then reassembled it rather than work on a scaffold. These have been locations that were either indoor large buildings or the exterior of the building couldn't be turned into a construction site. Most of this is very messy and requires drop cloths and lots of regular clean up.

So, foam for up high and something more substantial like the concrete or stucco overlay system on lower portions where people will lean against it. It can actually be made to match. There needs be some element in the design to break up the seams or the difference between the upper and lower levels.

Having a great facade is a deal maker to customers but very few are willing to spend the time and money to provide one.

Skeered
11-19-2012, 10:17 AM
I was figuring on have a small ledge at 8' on the horizontal seam. Maybe some fancier work where customers are up close to hide some vertical seams. Yup, I don't care about being up on scaffolding or a ladder either. May be one of those things where I rent a scissor lift to throw it all up. The 8x12 brick room I had in my haunt looked great. Even at 4' away looking at a seam under light looked pretty good as I spent time to make sure the joints lined up nicely. From a distance you'll never notice.

Allen H
11-19-2012, 11:06 PM
I get my pink foam from Home depot and I get my white EPS foam from Powerfoam in Midlothian TX.

freak 'n' stein
11-21-2012, 10:16 AM
Rehashing an old but useful thread

http://www.hauntworld.com/haunted_house_forums/showthread.php?7470-Styrofoam-sculpting

Scenic Art Productions
11-22-2012, 01:12 AM
Hello,

I live in Florida. I use allot of foam, not only for sets but signs as well. Yes, I do prefer and recommend using a urethane hard coat over the foam then a texture coat (if texture is wanted) over the top of it. Sometimes the customers do not have the budget to do so though, so I give them what they want. I have done signs with raw EPS Styrofoam with allot of layers of exterior paint over it. The sign pictured has been up for seven years, through several tropical storms and still looks good (just starting to show age). The city gates to Bethlehem pictured is raw EPS Styrofoam with a texture coat over it. It has been up for almost five years. It has survived as well. The only repairs I had to do were due to a tree falling on part of it and a vandal vandalized a part. These were minor repairs too. I have done other projects around the country and some out but those had a urethane hard coat over it. This year Night Terrors Haunted House in Jacksonville Florida had asked me to build a water drainage tunnel in their Attraction named Outbreak. The designer, Nate Mitchell of N8 Creative Studios designed it with some brick into it. The entrance to the tunnel is a brick pattern I had cut on the hot wire machine in rows. They were glued staggered onto a plywood backing then a texture coat was applied. It survived allot of traffic without any damage. This was an indoor attraction though. If you want to see more pictures check out my company page at: https://www.facebook.com/scenicartproductions I hope this gives you some help.

Good Luck,
Robert Travis
Scenic Art Productions
ScenicArtProductions@Yahoo.COM
https://www.facebook.com/scenicartproductions