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Ruafraid
10-07-2006, 08:20 AM
Last night I visited a local haunt that in my opinion seems to break all the rules on what would be considered safe. Its almost all total darkness and fog you can barely see anything. Once you get to the first area to move forward you have to almost crawl for a while to get through to the next area (I hit my head at least 3 times) this happens 2 more times in the haunt. They also have several up and down ramps that you do not know are there and almost fall on due to total darkness and other wood cross beams that you hit through it. They have a guy with a chainsaw on top of you in one and the sparks from the wire mesh above fall on you and in your hair. At the end the 3rd chainsaw event when you are exiting and the guy chases you well into the outside one girl fell over a chain link fence panel that was allowed to fall out of place at an angle to the ground and she got banged up. I went there last year and the sparks falling on you were there as well but not all this other stuff. It just seems the wrong way to do things. This is a very large haunt and popular as well.

Jim Warfield
10-07-2006, 11:51 AM
Sounds as if it's catering to those who like physical abuse?
If you begin paying total strangers to abuse you and beat you up, well, what can I say? I know your close family members will feel left out and be hurt.
"That was our "job"!

CyanideSolutions
10-07-2006, 05:04 PM
That doesnt sound too safe to me. Are they not following ADA regulations? How is a disabled individual suppossed to enjoy this haunt? The Americans with Disabilities act just recently started a class action lawsuit against Target for not having their website be accessible to blind people. Yes that is what I said. So how is someone who is in a wheel chair or walks with a cane suppossed to navigate this environment?

Do you care to share the name? I know I dont want to go there. My wife has MS and has to walk with a cane and she cant enjoy this attraction.

DeathReaper
10-07-2006, 09:35 PM
Sounds like Haunted House UnSafety!! :lol:

Chris
10-09-2006, 10:19 AM
That doesnt sound too safe to me. Are they not following ADA regulations? How is a disabled individual suppossed to enjoy this haunt? The Americans with Disabilities act just recently started a class action lawsuit against Target for not having their website be accessible to blind people. Yes that is what I said. So how is someone who is in a wheel chair or walks with a cane suppossed to navigate this environment?

Do you care to share the name? I know I dont want to go there. My wife has MS and has to walk with a cane and she cant enjoy this attraction.

The question is, should a haunted attraction be shut down in order to satisfy a mythical and impossible to meet demand for equality made by a tiny minority? Put another way, when does the insanity end? For example, isn't it discriminatory that people with heart ailments cannot enjoy your haunted attraction? Shouldn't you be forced to adjust your level of scare so that EVERYONE can enjoy exactly the same mundane and boring experience? If not, why not? There are FAR more people with heart conditions than there are people who need a wheelchair? What about kids? Is it fair that the parents of little kids be forced to hire a sitter in order to enjoy your haunt? Shouldn't evey haunt in America be forced to "tone it down"?

How about blind people? Shouldn't every haunted attraction in america be mandated, by law, to have braille desciptions of the scenes so that blind people might also enjoy them? Shouldn't we be forced, by law, to remove our foggers (some people have lung problems) and strobes (those poor epileptics) and foam-latex appliances and masks (latex allergies)? What about people with a traumatic history, perhaps opne involving abuse or violence? Isn't it insensitive that we often include violence and depictions of gore? Are we not traunatizing these poor people further? Shouldn't we be forced to stop?

Or, perhaps, maybe it's okay if we just run our businesses however we see fit -- and without big nanny-state government looking over our shoulders. Wheelchair accessable haunts will get that extra ten customers a year that the non-accessable haunts lose, and it will only cost them hundreds of thousands of dollars to do it.