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View Full Version : Fog machines/Smoke Detectors



xxxdirk
01-31-2008, 12:45 PM
I am in the planning stages for this season. Can any of you help? I love fog in haunts. However, whenever I use it, it seems to set off the smoke detectors. Smoke detectors are required in haunts so how do you all manage to not have the detectors go off?

Howie Slobber Erlich
01-31-2008, 01:30 PM
Most fire inspectors will allow you to use heat detectors instead of smoke. Ask them if this is possible. They hook into your fire system the same way that the smoke detectors do. They will not trigger due to the use of fog machines, they go off when a certain temperature is reached.

Howie "Slobber" Erlich
Deadly Intentions Haunted House
www.deadlyintentionshaunt.com

Jim Warfield
02-01-2008, 10:14 PM
My fog is particulair to certain small display areas so I have a small, quiet fan and a hole in the wall right above the fogger, the effect has to only be a temporary thing, unlike most applications probably, but this works in such a situation.
If you need some custom wall-holes look for my booth at Vegas , I have always sold a bunch of smaller holes in Vegas for pants pockets.

damon carson
02-02-2008, 02:01 PM
I was wondering if anyone has had any luck using hazors in a tent or a temporary structor than a building. And wondering if they worked as well as in a building. I found a place on the net with a very affordable hazor that uses regular fog fluid. Any input is appreciated.
Damon

drfrightner
02-02-2008, 02:29 PM
Age old topic...

To my knowledge there is NO fog machine or fog fluid that doesn't set off a smoke detector. Additionally to my knowledge there is no smoke detector that can tell the difference between fog and real smoke.

The best solution is fast dissipation fog so it will be gone before it reaches the ceiling or don't use smokes and get rate of rise heats. In our haunted houses we only use rate of rise heats.

Larry

cooperfan
02-02-2008, 07:42 PM
My fire Alarm people told me they make a detector that measures carbon monoxide put off by smoke. but that they are expensive. they are used by skating rinks.

Jim Warfield
02-03-2008, 11:18 AM
Do skating rinks use fog effects? Or is it the cold the detectors don't handle?

Mr. Haunt
02-03-2008, 11:41 AM
As for the smoke detectors, most of them are built with a lazar that bounces off of a mirror. If this beam is blocked for what ever reason, the detector will sound.

This is how basic detectors work. Anything can set them off, bugs, dust, fog, and yes SMOKE. This is why it is important to keep your smoke detectors clean and free of anything that can break the beam from the lazar.

HEY AND DON'T FORGET TO CHANGE THE BATTERY EVERY 12 MONTHS!

This is Mr. Firefighter changing back to Mr. Haunt! LOL

Greg Chrise
02-03-2008, 11:43 AM
OMG, I'm being haunted by Captain Kelly smoke detector commercials.

Motograter
02-03-2008, 12:52 PM
Mr. haunt is right about the Smoke detectors. I work for a fire alarm company that does inspections and installations. Fog machines or anything that gets inside the detectors will trigger an alarm. I use "smoke in a can" at work to set off the alarm to see if it works and how sensitive it is. I would recommend heat detectors. We did an installations job at a haunted house here in Michigan 2 years ago. We installed heats instead of smokes and he is really happy.

Jim Warfield
02-04-2008, 07:08 PM
I found out the hard way that bugs can set off alarms, then I recently read that dust, cold, red-headed step-children also can give false alarms.
Guess what kind of conditions are to be found here in my house?
3 out of 4 doesn't make it quiet or fun.
How come they always pick some really late hour to go off?
Well, I guess that I do too.
I got the dusty, cold, red-headed bug.
Those old-fashioned sticky bug strips help though if you put them up close to the alarm.