PDA

View Full Version : How Much on Average Do Your Wall Panels Cost?



oakhillshaunterTHEFEAR
02-21-2009, 08:19 AM
The reason I ask this is because I built 5 wall panels out of 2x4s and a 1/2 inch ply. All of the wood and hardware for assembly cost me about $50 a panels. But then I looked at them and realized that these are just panels of wood standing in the air. I still need to paint them, put up wallpaper, woodwork, etc. That could come out to totalling $100 a panel. How much do you guys spend on average per panel from framing to final product? Don't answer this post with "Oh thats to general of a question to answer" Just give me a ballpark. Vincent This Time!

Motograter
02-21-2009, 11:04 AM
I'm not 100% sure because my buddy bought all the panels before I stepped into the business. I believe it was $8,000-$10,000. My numbers could be slightly off but I know I'm close. That isn;t counting the fire proofing, paint, screws/nails, molding and wall paper. This year we plan on expanding the haunt larger so we'll have to start up on the walls again.

Brandon_K
02-21-2009, 11:18 AM
Cost of wood is going to differ across the country. That being said, how much are you paying for your plywood? Are you using sanded hardwood or what? Your initial cost is very high.

We pay ~$12 for 1/2 sheathing (not OSB!), maybe $4 total in 2x4's, so we're at $28 now.

Yes, you still have to fire retard them ($$$), paint them and decorate them. I couldn't tell you what a finished panel costs, as I don't break cost of paint down to per panel, sorry. After flame retard and paint, maybe $40? It's an expensive business.

Allen H
02-21-2009, 09:08 PM
Oak this is a good specific question.
My panels cost me about $30-60 each depending on the dressing they receive
Allen H

UnDeRTaKer313
02-22-2009, 08:12 AM
1/8 inch luan - $10
2 by 3's total- $5.88

Then my detailing (detailing, painting, wiring, ect) expenses come out to $500 per room, so i guess you could round to about 30 bucks a panel detailing.

so total is somewhere around $45 bucks a panel
or $16 bucks for materials.

ive learned that luan is a great choice because when you got 300 to 400 of them to haul around for 3 months, you to be able to lift them on your own easily, to become more productive.

also with luan you dont have to put like drywall of anything like than to get a nice smooth texture, you can just paint it. Check out www.rothauntedhouse.com - bruce is the one who turned me onto the stuff.

last note - 3.5 to 4 - 2 by 3 's are needed on each of the panels. perimeter and one going horizontally or vertial in the midle.

couple things you can think about, hope it helps,

terrormasue
02-22-2009, 06:35 PM
I know what OSB board is but what is this Luan board you are talking about? Is it any cheaper then OSB board? I am in the process of making 216 panels and if Luan is better then OSB please let me know. Thanks

Brandon_K
02-22-2009, 08:23 PM
Luan is basically thin plywood, 1/8". It works well for indoors, though it can get abused very quickly. It's also highly recommended that you use a fine tooth blade to cut it as it splinters heavily. I suggest not using it outside as it doesn't hold up to weather well, IMO, even after paint.

The Mad Hatter
02-22-2009, 10:27 PM
The Reign of terror haunted house is actually using 1/4" Water proof Luan not 1/8". The thicker luan holds up more. we also used 2 by 4's that have been ripped down for frame around the luan. This way the panels are Very light and very compact. (Store more in smaller area.) We have not had problems with the panels bowing, since the 2x4's were straight. Compared to using the cheap 1x.

- Frank Balzer (Scenic Designer ROT)

icandrawem2
02-22-2009, 10:54 PM
1/8"?! That to me seems WAY too thin to be using on wall panels that will have guest contact, especially in a high-scare area. It would be ok in other cases where you wont have to worry about it breaking. I wouldnt use anything less than 3/8" in guest areas, but thats just my personal opinion from experience. Lauan is a type of plywood that is available very thin like Mad Hatter said, but it can also be up to say 3/4" thick...its basically a generic name for a certain type of plywood which has thin veneers on both sides giving it a very smooth finish.

Terror, OSB is very strong but has a very uneven surface so you may not like it for aesthetic reasons, and it doesnt hold up very well outdoors...but its usually relatively cheap.

Jim Warfield
02-22-2009, 11:44 PM
If your "show" inspires roudy reactions from your customers or you allow drunken idiots in, then you won't be able to use thin, flimsey construction methods or materials.
Sometimes showing your customers a certain modicum of basic respect can help to eliminate their destructive behavior or have video cameras watching them and let them know it.
I have had good luck putting solid blocking inside of thin walls in the zones of potential punches and kicks landing and by all means, as earlier stated here have thicker walls to catch those reacting to the big scares.
Broken, splintered walls are not fun to try to fix in the middle of an October Saturday night.

oakhillshaunterTHEFEAR
02-23-2009, 10:33 AM
You know I have no idea where you guys find wood at those prices or maybe its just because I live in CA. But thanks for the input guys that actually helps my calculations. MUAHAHAHAHAHAHA! Vincent This Time!

Terrorknight
02-23-2009, 11:03 AM
North East Coast OSB is about $13 for like 3/8 sheet and 2x3x8 are $1.80's somewhere and you need 4 2x3 per panel. Luna is good for areas that aren't going to be in contact with customers, but as a panel for halls and high traffic areas I would never use it. It is great to work with, I use it a lot building floats and sets for stage shows but only set dressing in a haunt.

Dr Spooktakular
02-23-2009, 11:36 AM
Holy COW!! $13 for OSB, and I thought $5.75 here in Texas was expensive.

SomeThingInTheIce
02-23-2009, 11:47 AM
Ya, What the he// here in Florida I can get 3/8s siding for $9.95 from Lowes.

Holy COW!! $13 for OSB, and I thought $5.75 here in Texas was expensive.

Boo Crew Production
02-23-2009, 02:39 PM
Our wall panels are constructed out of 3/8 inch CDX plywood the framing is 2x 2's pre drilled for bolting together. The plywood is glued and stapled to the framing, the framing is screwed together. by gluing and stapling the panels together you increase the strength substatually.

2 years ago we did a outdoor event to raise funds for a cub-scout pack. while setting up a tree approx. 10 inches in diameter fall on the rooms I was set-up. only damage, a chipped peice of plywood and a hole in the tarp.

Material needed;
1- 4x8 sheet 3/8" plywood 11.00
2- 2x4x8' 2.00 each
1 qt fireproofing approx 5.00
1 qt paint 6.00
total for basic black panels 24.00

of coarse these aren't detailed out panels,the cost of that would very widely. Yes they can get pretty expensive quickly.

oakhillshaunterTHEFEAR
02-23-2009, 06:29 PM
The glue and stapling is exactly how I built mine. Ofcourse an update on that. The five panels only one of will move on to get detail work because the scarp wood I used to build these is just crap. I have no money so I use all the wood around my house. 1 out of 5! Anywho I priced it out in CA

1/2" Plywood - $23
2x4x8 - $5 (4)
Box of 3 inch staples - $6
Liquid Nails Tube - $3

Total for basic assembly $52

xtremecreator
02-23-2009, 07:42 PM
I have people running through 1/2 PLywood with actual 2x4 walls. Depends on your show??????

oakhillshaunterTHEFEAR
02-23-2009, 08:43 PM
First I want to say if you've seen that happen then you've seen that happen. That being said I find that hard to believe. I've seen half inch ply ran into by 250 football players, the wood stood strong. If you want to know my honest opinion if you guys are haven't problems with customers running through your panels you guys aren't spending enough on hardware, or your not doing it right. Still I want everyone to remember I'm not trying to stir the pot I'm just sayin...

Ok now I post a pic of the only, I guess you can call it, wall panel that seems good enough to go to the next stage. I built it out of scrap wood 2x6 2x4s. I cut all the boards down to 2x4x8s, then framed out a 4x8 box frame. I used 2 1/2 inch construction staples and liquid nails that I already had. Then I found all of the 1/2 inch ply scraps that I had in the yard and puzzled them into a 4x8 sheet.
The thing infront is what I pieced together out of old electrical stuff. Found a really cool 6x6 to attach it all too then I attached that whole thing to the panel. I kinda like the leatherface feel of this panel as is BUT. I'd like to hear some suggestions of theming. I thought maybe to mudd all of the seams to make it look flat then paint with the paint I have. IDK. Vincent This Time!

UnDeRTaKer313
02-24-2009, 03:31 PM
how much does that weigh?

looks pretty sweet.
also id go with something cheaper than the 23 bucks a sheet.
and also i agree with you it really hard to break through plywood, if you deseign panels right i cant break through my luan panels and im trying.
it because our hardware is very strong, and we have a really strong frame.

Allen H
02-24-2009, 03:57 PM
I would not paint it, go with the ghetto! Since you have an electrical box on there I would mist with black spray paint around the box a bit. because the scariest thing about electricity is fire.
Is this for a home haunt?
If so have you considered canvas panels (the kind theaters use for scenic flats) they would be much cheaper and very easy to theme. just a consideration.
Allen H

icandrawem2
02-24-2009, 05:41 PM
Our wall panels are constructed out of 3/8 inch CDX plywood the framing is 2x 2's pre drilled for bolting together. The plywood is glued and stapled to the framing, the framing is screwed together. by gluing and stapling the panels together you increase the strength substatually.

2 years ago we did a outdoor event to raise funds for a cub-scout pack. while setting up a tree approx. 10 inches in diameter fall on the rooms I was set-up. only damage, a chipped peice of plywood and a hole in the tarp.

Material needed;
1- 4x8 sheet 3/8" plywood 11.00
2- 2x4x8' 2.00 each
1 qt fireproofing approx 5.00
1 qt paint 6.00
total for basic black panels 24.00

of coarse these aren't detailed out panels,the cost of that would very widely. Yes they can get pretty expensive quickly.


You cant really price the paint and fire retardant by the quart though, unless you plan on building just one panel...when you buy the paint and FR 5 gal at a time, that price drops drastically, depending on how you apply the paint and how much you thin it. With this method, how are you arranging your ripped 2x4s? Im thinking a perimeter with one more vertical stud in the center?

11 bucks for 3/8" CDX isnt a bad price

rwrussom
02-24-2009, 06:38 PM
Fireproofing - what kind and where from at 5.00/qt or $20 a gal.

oakhillshaunterTHEFEAR
02-24-2009, 07:09 PM
That particular panel weighs 60-80 pounds and I'm a semi big guy(190) with no problem moving it around. Two people per panel sheesh no sweat. Its not for a home haunt its something I wanted to build to get some frame techniques refreshed for my panel business idea. So... Vincent This Time!

Speaking of which did that email work Nick and any decisions on the topic?

mindtumor
02-24-2009, 07:39 PM
$100 a panel? Are you kidding me? What the hell are you making them out of, solid oak? $30-$40 per panel is what it cost me and that is fire proofing and paint. It cost $4000 to build our walls, fireproofing and everything..

Greg Chrise
02-24-2009, 09:05 PM
Most haunts do not operate with climate controled environments on all year round or if they are gypsy haunts the storage units are not climate controlled so, they might as well be outdoors with humidity concerns.

That in mind, we go with CDX, the X means Exterior glue in the semi finished plywood. They are about $12 a sheet. Over some time the 2x4 lumber will rot and will need to be replaced, so, the sheeting is screwed with no glue so the units can continually be maintained over many years.

We paint every piece of lumber and sheeting prior assembly so they are sealed and not wicking up moisture even if indeed used outdoors.

Way back in history, OSB was the new wood. That was 30 years ago and it still doesn not hold up to moisture or humidity and takes a cosiderable more amount of paint.

Many find Luan to be very smooth but, brittle and hard to cut and it splinters from abuse and I never heard of treated luan as some one mentioned. Some times starting out the best place to get advice is to go to the lumber store and talk to the lumber. That way it fits your budget and how long you expect it to last.

Also, not every scene or application would necessarily use only one kind of wood.

This using what ends up being a 2x2 frame is't real great. Just use full 2x4s and there is sufficient meat to keep screwing them together from year to year to year. Heavier outboard lumber means no center support needed at all. If is seems flmsey after years of use, install plywood triangles as needed to the corners on the back side.

Another way is to have the wall system be CDX (3/8inch) and if an area requires extra special detail add a skin of luan decor or detail only for that specific scene.

It is also an availability thing. You might find on a free list, people selling used plywood for $3 a sheet. Go get it. Have money set aside for when it becomes available and a place to take it to.

Screws can be installed with any drill with a bit on it, even with a power cord. Staples mean a staple gun, air lines, air compressor and hoping that you aren't spending hours unjamming staples. Glue means when the panel needs repair, you are throwing out the entire panel or chewing it up into something else. Save the cost of glue and just use screws alone.

sinister13
03-09-2009, 07:11 PM
I've made alot of wall panels.... I cut the 2x4's down to 1 1/2 so with 2 8 ft studs I can get 1 and parts for another panel drywall screws are used to attach them together with 3/8 ply wood sheeting pre- drill holes in the "studs" to prevent splitting and depending on the wall decor you want is the main price, but u can find many discounted wallpapers and throw a nasty wash on them they are relativly cheap... want to invest a little more you can add foam skulls for fake foam bricks for an even creepier look its all in your imagination.

oakhillshaunterTHEFEAR
03-12-2009, 07:44 PM
Ok I built a roof facade type deal for my single working wall panel and well lets just say don't stick frame in the dark with a 2 1/2 inch staple gun. The damn thing looked pretty creepy I'm proud to say but the vertical supports broke and then the whole thing fell ontop of me. Kinda hurt but its all good. I'm just bummed that two ours of that work went into a pile of fire wood. Well thats ok really it was fire wood to begin with so no harm no foul. Vincent This Time!