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Front Yard Fright
05-30-2009, 08:54 PM
I make a couple images for my website every year. Nothing too fancy, but I like what I make. However, it really ticks me off when I find images I've created on other peoples websites.

I just came along this site tonight
http://bayouscream.com/

In the lower right corner there's a "I WANT YOU" Image I created a couple years ago for my website. They did not contact me to use it at all!

Also, it's easy to tell that they stole the background from another haunt website (Can't remember it off the top of my head.)

I e-mailed them and asked them to remove it promptly... But it just sucks that this stuff happens.

Do any of you haunt owners Copyright your artwork? How do you go along in doing so? I know my stuff I make isn't amazing or anything... I just don't want others using my work!
:roll:.

Grimley
05-30-2009, 09:14 PM
Technically as soon as you create the art it is protected but fighting someone who has stolen it is a different matter.

RoguesHollow
05-31-2009, 12:27 AM
As long as you can prove you had the artwork first because you made it or had it made for you then you can go after whoever stole it. However it can be very costly to do it and it doesn't really stop someone else from turning around and stealing it too. It sucks but it happens. In fact I found a couple pieces of my artwork on that site you linked as well. Good luck with getting them to take the art down. It shocks me how often I find people who just think its ok to take art they didn't create.

Mad Wax Sculptor
05-31-2009, 11:27 PM
I have a related question on a similar topic. How much or rather what % of the art work must be changed befor it becomes a new work. Ive heard 1/4 and Ive also heard no amout of rework makes it new and legal. Any one know?

craigsrobotics
06-01-2009, 09:35 AM
Just copy-protect (via HTML) your web pages and graphics, that way, no one can right-click, or use any Windows controls to copy your property...If you don't manage your own website, your provider/programmer should know how to do this...you need to insert a few lines of HTML code on each webpage you want to protect.:)

Problem solved!

Twin Locusts
06-01-2009, 09:43 AM
Just copy-protect (via HTML) your web pages and graphics, that way, no one can right-click, or use any Windows controls to copy your property...If you don't manage your own website, your provider/programmer should know how to do this...you need to insert a few lines of HTML code on each webpage you want to protect.:)

Problem solved!


This will stop some folks that try to steal your work; however, if they have much photoshop or general web graphic knowledge they can simply CTRL + PRT SCR then paste the entire page into photoshop.

I owned a small apparel site for several years and I asked my programmer to copy-protect the images, he suggested it'd just slow down anyone wanting to use the image so we didn't do it. For that industry it ending up being a bonus not C-P'ing the images as bloggers would do a write up on my work and include hyper linked images.

Anyway, this is a good idea but may not be completely effective.

Did the site take down your image when you requested? I do a lot of image work - hack not a pro - and it is infuriating when someone steals your work, especially when you may have given them permission if they asked!

Please follow up with what the offender does, thanks.

Twin Locusts
06-01-2009, 09:55 AM
I have a related question on a similar topic. How much or rather what % of the art work must be changed befor it becomes a new work. Ive heard 1/4 and Ive also heard no amout of rework makes it new and legal. Any one know?


I've been told 15%. Now, how they arrive at that number or measure it in a work is beyond me. I suppose square inches or centimeters of new or excised rendering or image.

Don't know how changes in color play in.

To me it's kind of like smut vs. art, you know the difference when you see it. Sort of the same with an intellectual property rip off, when it happens it's pretty obvious.

Mr. Malice
06-01-2009, 11:08 AM
An easy way to have proof of the creating of a an image that you created is simply mail it to yourself through snailmail. DO NOT OPEN THE ENVELOPE! You will have a sealed copy of the image with a date stamped on it. This was explained to me by our business lawyer to save the costs and troubles of the trademark work for small, non-profit business. Also have a letter signed by the person who created it in the envelope.

Twin Locusts
06-01-2009, 11:30 AM
An easy way to have proof of the creating of a an image that you created is simply mail it to yourself through snailmail. DO NOT OPEN THE ENVELOPE! You will have a sealed copy of the image with a date stamped on it. This was explained to me by our business lawyer to save the costs and troubles of the trademark work for small, non-profit business. Also have a letter signed by the person who created it in the envelope.

Wow. Simple yet iron clad, two of my favorite things! Thanks for sharing.

Front Yard Fright
06-01-2009, 02:57 PM
The person removed the images without questioning.
Thank goodness.
Thanks for all your help and input.

davidm
06-01-2009, 11:13 PM
An easy way to have proof of the creating of a an image that you created is simply mail it to yourself through snailmail. DO NOT OPEN THE ENVELOPE! You will have a sealed copy of the image with a date stamped on it. This was explained to me by our business lawyer to save the costs and troubles of the trademark work for small, non-profit business. Also have a letter signed by the person who created it in the envelope.

This simply isn't true (at least in the US). Shame on that lawyer.
http://www.snopes.com/legal/postmark.asp

Twin Locusts
06-02-2009, 08:33 AM
Yeah, after reading Snopes there's a sticking point as to the time you began 'claiming' ownership, which doesn't prove you 'have' ownership.

The thing is, to me, that the real courtroom type of infringement is only likely to manifest with major players - Disney, MGM, etc.

That is, these players stand to lose significant cash stack of someone rips off a character or a story. I'm in the small time artwork and image crowd as well and don't like my stuff used without permission, however, it's not likely that I will lose much money or prestige, nor does the usurper stand to gain much through the use of my images.

If they did, however, it'd be nice to be able to claim rights. This site is a good resource for both, getting your work out for use, and protecting, claiming, and time stamping it.

http://creativecommons.org/license/

The only difinitive answer to this kind of question is going to come from an intellectual rights attorney and that isn't typically gratis. Sometimes I think the advice is to register and fill out forms with the .gov because it drives fees and a cottage industry for lawyers, but don't ask me I'm cynical.