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Thread: Creating cave scene.

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  1. Default Creating cave scene. 
    #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Manitowoc Wisconsin www.nightmarefactoryhaunt.com
    Posts
    2,055
    Have seen quite a few haunts with realistic cave sets and I was wondering what the best way to accomplish this is? Wood frame, chicken wire and then spray foam? I also heard some haunts built the set with wood and even stachtites and stagmites and then coated the whole thing with bed liner spray..... Any videos out there, or can anyone give any hints....?
    www.atheateroflostsouls.com Or if you need makeup or supplies www.abramagic.com


    "I am a frickin evil genius who deserves some frickin respect!"
     

  2. Default  
    #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    9,194
    The way I would do it is a wood frame built from 2x2's build it the way you want it to look... then put chicken wire all over it and SHAPE it with the chicken wire. From there glue foam onto the chicken wire big chunks of foam... then carve it.

    In the end you either can spray it with a gunite type of spray which would then make it feel like real stone or you can hard coat it... depending on what you want the final texture to be determines what you will or won't use. Clearly in the end you light and paint the tunnel. There are other ways to do it like make molds and pull them from resin or fiberglass or whatever but for us the simple haunt owners we have to do it the cheapest. I think the worst way would be vac form it won't look great but it would look okay.

    Larry
     

  3. Default  
    #3
    Terror on the fox has an amazing cave.... They did it with chicken wire and spray foam... Tattoo is doing a seminar at national haunters convention showing how they did it!
    Tim Bunch
    House Of Horrors And Haunted Catacombs
    thehorrorbizness@aol.com
    www.thehouseofhorrors.com
     

  4. Default  
    #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Manitowoc Wisconsin www.nightmarefactoryhaunt.com
    Posts
    2,055
    So, Larry, where does one get a styrofoam sprayer, or can one hirea company?
    www.atheateroflostsouls.com Or if you need makeup or supplies www.abramagic.com


    "I am a frickin evil genius who deserves some frickin respect!"
     

  5. Default  
    #5
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    303
    I used a local insulation company with the big spray trucks, (the ones that spray into attics etc.) It was just easier and faster for me..



    Kale
     

  6. Default  
    #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Columbia Missouri
    Posts
    793
    I second the spray foam insulation truck. He made short work out of it and did a great job. We used wood framing and stretched spandex to it and stapled it in place. Then he came in and shot the insulation on it. It worked great for us and the spray foam guy was very reasonable.
    We did our waterfall and forest the same way. We took it out this year with plans on moving it and putting it back in and expanding it this summer.
    DONT FORGET TO DROP YOUR SPRINKLER HEADS DOWN INTO THE CAVE BEFORE HE SPRAYS IT!

    Greg
    Fearfest
    Last edited by N2SPOOKINU; 04-04-2010 at 10:02 AM.
     

  7. Default  
    #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Cleveland Ohio
    Posts
    689
    Another relatively cheap way to do it, though heavier and may not be quite as durable if customers have the chance of running full bore into it, is building the frame out of wood, then screwing up old scraps of carpet and coating it all in monster mud (paint and plaster mixture, add in some sawdust for extra texture) You do the mud in your darker color, then dry brush it with a lighter color and can look pretty good, even more so with creative lighting.

    I did a giant stone cave entrance archway for a local play by doing this similar method with a wood and chicken wire frame, shaped the wire, then did monster mud with burlap almost like paper mache in technique. I opted for the burlap for the thinness as it had to be on wheels and moved on and off set. Once painted even in the bright stage lights it looked really good, and held up with no damage for an the entire 2 month run of the show.

    Also, if going the spray route...especially if you are a bigger haunt, or want the freedom to work at your own pace and change as you go, and want to DIY it more... Smooth On makes a really nice Spray system that works on cartridges and can spray foam, silicone, plastics, and foam coatings. I think the initial system is around $800 and just needs a decent compressor to run it.


    Mike "Pogo" Hach
    Last edited by jakprintsHAUNT; 04-03-2010 at 09:35 PM.
    -Mike "Pogo" Hach
     

  8. Default  
    #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Posts
    704
    Quote Originally Posted by xxxdirk View Post
    So, Larry, where does one get a styrofoam sprayer, or can one hirea company?
    I know the crew from the Branson Zoo/Branson Haunted Adventure do the spray installations. Their work is phenomenal.
    Katie Lane
    Partner/VP
    Raven's Wolf Art Productions (www.ravens-wolf.com)


    Bansheette Morningstar (www.bansheette.com)
     

  9. Default  
    #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Redding
    Posts
    283
    Here is my cave. I used chicken wire and pulled it in different directions to create the shape and used weed control cloth as a backer then sprayed the foam.
    Attached Images
     

  10. Default Dreamreaper 
    #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    37
    So how durable is your cave. I think it looks great. We did one out of 2x2 and chicken wire (as Larry posted), but we took burlap over the chicken wire and then took a drywall mud and paint mixture to coat it. Then we airbrushed over it and it seemed to work fine. The only thing that scared us was that it had kind of a flex to it. And thanks to us being outdoors and the rainy season we had this year, it needs to be redone. Is the spray foam idea pretty weather resilient? Anyway I was just wondering how durable your set was.
     

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