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Thread: haunt style design in my home...advice needed!

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  1. Default haunt style design in my home...advice needed! 
    #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Cleveland Ohio
    Posts
    689
    So Im looking for a little advice and/or ideas....

    I have an unfinished basement with currently block walls. We have been talking about finishing it and were originally going to do drywall. We have also talked about curtaining the walls like you would find in a theater as the bulk of the area would be for entertaining.

    So my wife made an amazing suggestion that I think in theory could be really neat, but wanted to come to the experts for your thoughts on practicality and safety, and/or if we are insane to try something of this nature in our home? We were thinking of using pink foam which we were already going to be using to insulate the walls anyway, but then carving them into a stone and/or artistic pattern and it being the actual wall structure (aside from any main frames to separate the rooms).

    So here in lies my questions and concerns:

    1. What would be the best way to fasten it to the cement block walls but not show the fastening points?
    2. Aside from full on fiberglass, Is there something I can coat over it that would make it durable enough for a permanent installation (but with the ability to be covered or removed if when we decide to sell our home the new owners don't dig something like that), but at the same time not kill detail work. I want it to be able to handle a friend or relative bumping into it after drinking, and also be able to cover seams so that it looks natural, but again not so thick that it would kill detail.
    3. Thought about following the design across the ceiling as well. So if we go all the way around we would need to run venting and some electrical through it as well. Would this be safe?
    4. I also have a concern of it being durable and safe from destruction from pets and if we decide to produce spawn down the road.
    5. We have an interior waterproofing system so we are somewhat limited as to how the walls can be built as is (around the outer perimeter we cannot drill into the floor within 1 foot of the wall)

    I know this may sound like a crazy undetaking, but if we could pull it off it would make the space so much more ours. We are currently redoing our bathroom in a black and orange pattern with bats and such on the walls. We initially did most of the home in flat but darker colors and have decided to take things to the next level. My office currenly has a very Tim Burton-esque painted texture on the walls that are scratches of dark and light gray (doing a similar texture in bathroom) with a custom built desk that is built around and corner and into a small closet to give you an idea of what we have done already.

    Thoughts/suggestions anyone?

    Mike "Pogo" Hach
    -Mike "Pogo" Hach
     

  2. Default  
    #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    New Orleans, Louisiana
    Posts
    641
    Its not hard to do, I know that much, but I have never put my hands on it personally. If no one can help you hear, get back with me and I will try and hook you with some people. Good luck!
    ~*~How is a raven like a writing desk ?
    ~*~*~There both the perfect tools for picking at the brain.
    ~*~*~*~An my favorite game you ask ?
    ~*~*~*~*~ Raven on the desk of course.

    Jessica Ward
     

  3. Default  
    #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Cleveland Ohio
    Posts
    689
    Quote Originally Posted by darkXmoon View Post
    Its not hard to do, I know that much, but I have never put my hands on it personally. If no one can help you hear, get back with me and I will try and hook you with some people. Good luck!
    The actual carving part I got down...its just a matter of making it nice and sturdy enough for in my home. Seams and durability wont be as forgiving when I see it every day.


    Mike "Pogo" Hach
    -Mike "Pogo" Hach
     

  4. Default  
    #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Mesquite, TX
    Posts
    2,788
    Mike,
    Sorry it took so long, I orginally didnt read the thread because I guessed what it was about...and was wrong. Here is my best.

    1. What would be the best way to fasten it to the cement block walls but not show the fastening points?
    Demand products has fasteners for foam, I wouldnt want to use a glue as that will be on the concrete forever. I would use screws with the demand heads on them.
    use the PB washers with masony screws. this will leave a screw and washer visible but drywall joint compound will hide those easily pre coating and painting. The hiding of them depends on your design, but there is always a way.
    http://www.demandproducts.com/search...earch=fastener

    2. Aside from full on fiberglass, Is there something I can coat over it that would make it durable enough for a permanent installation (but with the ability to be covered or removed if when we decide to sell our home the new owners don't dig something like that), but at the same time not kill detail work. I want it to be able to handle a friend or relative bumping into it after drinking, and also be able to cover seams so that it looks natural, but again not so thick that it would kill detail.
    Lots of things can do this, I really like polymer resins lately for foam work. You will need to do the wall in small batches but its a simple one to one mix. Thicken the mix with polyfiber so it will not run down the wall. I get mine from
    www.bitymoldsupply.com Call and talk to them and tell them what your doing Mitch is awesome.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VWkch-QEGkI

    3. Thought about following the design across the ceiling as well. So if we go all the way around we would need to run venting and some electrical through it as well. Would this be safe?
    Um....sure. Just kidding, Im sure it would be safe, If you want use silicone caulk around all the electrical that touches the foam as a spacer, but if those are hot enough to melt/ignit foam, then you have major wiring issues. and the venting will just be really well insulated.

    4. I also have a concern of it being durable and safe from destruction from pets and if we decide to produce spawn down the road.
    It should be fine, when I resin coat halls and such, I put more at hand level (like two or three coats) then I do at head or ceiling height, you should add it a bit thicker at spawn/pet height as well. but basically its plastic and pretty durable.

    5. We have an interior waterproofing system so we are somewhat limited as to how the walls can be built as is (around the outer perimeter we cannot drill into the floor within 1 foot of the wall)
    No problem, just keep your screws above that line, I would only use about 5 or 6 screws and washers per-panel.

    Now for what you didnt ask. I think you should attach the panels first, then lay out your design in pen/ marker (pencil if your afraid of commitment) and then do your carving burning and shaping on the wall. That always makes it easier for me, especially when you have to trim around outlets and such. Good luck.
    Allen H
    Last edited by Allen H; 11-10-2010 at 06:52 PM.
     

  5. Default Another coating i like 
    #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Arroyo Grande CA
    Posts
    35
    ROSCO makes a product appropriately named "foamcoat" I love the stuff.
     

  6. Default Or.. 
    #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Ravens Grin Inn, 411 carroll st.mount carroll ill.
    Posts
    12,813
    Do what I did. The neighbor destroyed two chimneys when the old house came down. I collected, cleaned the bricks with a small pointy chipping hammer, then took them to my basement and laid bricks!
    Saw out some plywood circles for round-topped windows or archways, cut a strip of sheet metal the width of the brick, screw the metal to the plywood frame, spaced with 2 by 4 scraps, lay up the bricks with mortar, allow to dry, set up, remove wood and sheet metal and you have a 3-D arched window or whatever?
    An 80 pound bag of quality mortar might cost you $6.00 A trowel $4.00, water is cheap.
    The actual bricks were free, just requiring effort carrying and cleaning them.
    "Boy, those bricks look so real!"
    "Yes they do."
    One big plus= no fumes from melting styro foam in your house, in your nose, on your clothes.
     

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