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Thread: So Halloween is dead last in terms of retail holidays?

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  1. Default So Halloween is dead last in terms of retail holidays? 
    #1
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    http://www.thestreet.com/story/11150...thers-day.html

    If not for Halloween ($6 billion), Father's Day would be dead last among retail holidays.
    So why have I always heard otherwise? If this is true, why do we see seasonal stores open up for halloween costumes, etc. but not for other holidays? Is this a recent development? Is this why the haunted attraction show at Transworld is growing while the wholesale side retracts...

    Wow, just a lot of interesting info.
    Brett Hays, Director
    Fear Fair
    www.fearfair.com
     

  2. Default  
    #2
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    I saw this as well and was confused. I have always read that Halloween was just behind Christmas, which made sense. I can't find a good listing of retail spending by any one reputable currently by googling.
    Brian Warner
    Owner of Evilusions www.EVILUSIONS.com
    Technical Director of Forsaken Haunted House www.Forsakenhaunt.com
    Mechanical Designer (animatronics) at Gore Galore www.Gore-Galore.com
     

  3. Default  
    #3
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    It sounds like they have there numbers flipped. Thanksgiving is 30 Billion and Halloween is only 6 Billion ? The only way this would make any sense is if they counted air and car travel into the mix ( It's the number one most traveled for holiday ) and if they add in bar tabs ( because kids come home from school and drink ALOT. I think who ever wrote this is just trying to down play Halloween.

    Robert
     

  4. Default  
    #4
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    It looks like their numbers are consistent with other data I am finding... perhaps we have all been believing a myth for many years?

    Five-year Comparison of the NRF BIGResearch Halloween Consumer Intentions and Actions Survey, 2005 - 2010:

    Total Amount Consumers Planned to Spend For the Halloween Holiday Overall

    $5.80 billion - 2010

    $4.75 billion - 2009

    $5.77 billion - 2008

    $5.07 billion - 2007

    $4.96 billion - 2006

    $3.29 billion - 2005
    http://retailindustry.about.com/od/s...redictions.htm
    Brett Hays, Director
    Fear Fair
    www.fearfair.com
     

  5. Default  
    #5
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    Food is not considered a retail member. Thus thanksgiving isn't part of retail holidays.
     

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    #6
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    In doing a lot of spending research, the 8 billion number is pretty accurate from what I have seen, but as with most things, it is only "reported" sales, as many haunted attractions and vendors would not report to the same outlets, as they technically are not retail spending, even though outlets such as the National Retail Federation lump them in on surveys of spending intentions of consumers. These numbers are typically retail only spending which means limits to candy, costumes, and general decorations. Things like many attractions, home haunts, professional props, etc... likely will not be counted in a lot of that spending.

    Other holidays will likely be including food, gifts, decoration etc... and in general are celebrated more widely and extravagantly than Halloween. General price on regular retail Halloween items are also generally smaller than other other holidays as well. You purchase pumpkins for Halloween, but entire trees for Christmas. Trees average $50-150, pumpkins average $5-10. On Easter parents buy large baskets full of specialty candy for all of their children, on halloween, you buy standard fair or simple candies like smarties for trick or treaters in which each child only gets a couple pieces. So the numbers on other holidays based on what they are purchasing are naturally going to be higher. While there may not be pop up stores for other holidays, there are generally much larger showings at the big box stores and switch overs for many smaller stores that carry specialty items. This is most apparent at Christmas.

    I think as an industry based on all factors we are doing pretty good. There have been increases steadily over the past 3 years, and from what I have read in general attractions have been getting more business over that same time period as well.

    Just my thoughts based on data I have found.


    Mike "Pogo" Hach
    -Mike "Pogo" Hach
     

  7. Default  
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    Quote Originally Posted by piercemanor View Post
    It may only be calculated among candy and costumes for trick or treating, are you sure it applies to us haunters spending a few thousand on one prop, and a few hundred here? Along with ticket & concession sales? Because for it to be averaged among your conventional kiddie halloween the final number makes more sense to me.
    But even at that, we're back to my original point. Nearly every city in America has a seasonal Halloween store pop up. This happens every year, so apparently they are profitable. Where is the seasonal Easter store, etc? Fourth of July makes sense. I have friends who operate fireworks stores and the average sale is $400 to $800 per customer.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Brett Hays, Director
    Fear Fair
    www.fearfair.com
     

  8. Default  
    #8
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    I dont buy the numbers look at thanksgiving . If you spend 2 hundred dollars a house hold it gos to feed 4to 8 people roughly. Halloween is more personal and has more personal spending compared to other holidays. As I see it more people spending more per person compared to thanksgiving where 1 purchase is for several
    I'm only doing this to impress 2 people ... The fire marshal and the customer that's it !!!
     

  9. Default  
    #9
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    Yikes! Really? I can't believe that! I spend a heck of a lot more on Halloween than I do any other holiday except Christmas. I'm sure I'm not the norm, but almost every kiddo in the schools I work in come to the Halloween or "Fall Festival" (I guess the PC thing to do now in schools) come in with store bought costumes and heaps of candy and trinkets, so I don't get it.
     

  10. Default It's true! 
    #10
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    There are lies, damn lies, and statistics. It's true and even confirmed by snopes.com the urban legend debunking experts. Those of us that love the holiday to the insane level that we do, or are in the industry are a very small percentage of the population. The retail numbers are driven by gift giving. Mother's Day, Valentines Day, Easter, Fathers Day are all distant second to Xmas but eek out Halloween because of the gift giving aspect. It doesn't include monies brought in by Haunted attractions either.
     

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