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Thread: Cheap advertising

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  1. Default  
    #11
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    Nov 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrfoos View Post
    I'm starting to understand why so many haunted houses fail.
    :roll:

    I have a college in my town with 10k students. I would rather take that $300 and have extra flyers printed than have a spam list. I have in the past given the flyers to all the dorm monitors and they each in turn passed them out to all the dorm residents. I have a relationship with the workers in the food court areas where I can put them right next to the registers. I can reach most of the campus students this way and do it in a much less invasive way. Not to mention they have a physical flyer in their hand versus a spam filter or del key. Gives the feeling of a much more local and personal touch too versus email.
     

  2. Default Or Maybe? 
    #12
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    Ravens Grin Inn, 411 carroll st.mount carroll ill.
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    Grab the mic to the full dorm adress system and yell about your haunted house. Maybe a very creative, scary voice, sound defect or phony news bulletin first to get everyone's full attention?
    Sure. This will work.
    Shimer College used their full dorm address system to fill out their basketball team on game night:"Attention! Anybody know how to play basketball? Come on down here and try on a uniform!"
    (And that is how they now hold the small -collegiate record for the most continious losses ever! I got to see some of those games! It was HYSTERICALLY ENTERTAINING and memorable!)
     

  3. Default  
    #13
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    Dec 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skeered View Post
    Baloney. Whatever you have received was the result of your signing up in one way or another with one of these "Reputable" companies.
    Or it could also be one of those "third party announcements" options that auto-populate whenever you sign up for new email addresses, social media and networking accounts, and so on. There are so many "legit" ways for major companies to engage in email marketing, that they don't need to do baldfaced, blatant spamming.

    Quote Originally Posted by Skeered View Post
    That is the mature business attitude I like to see in people.
    Indeed.

    Quote Originally Posted by mrfoos View Post
    I mean, when I was in college I would be PISSED if I got a campus approved email about a haunted house in my college mailbox.
    Well, that confirmed my suspicions that you really don't understand this whole legit, white-hat marketing thing.

    Obviously, if the college sent out a mass mailing about an event that was tied into the college's mission statement, that would be legit, like say for instance something that supported a campus charity or the alumni association, and the student body shouldn't be any more offended by that mailing that any other mailing, like for instance some announcement from the Student Union, or the Entertainment Committee promoting an event.

    That truly would be gold, and at $300 a pop, a bargain.

    If, however, you just spam everyone, then there is no tie-in to the school - nothing "approved" - and you are just like any other spammer. If so, you realistically only have one shot at sending out an email that could be seen as spam. People are either interested or they are not, but in any direct marketing campaign, you realistically only have a 4% success rate. That's the target. Anything more than that, and direct marketers are usually dancing in the street.

    So, we are talking only a 4% response on any emails that actually get thru and aren't flagged by the spam filters. To get any more traction than that, you would need multiple impressions or contacts, and if that was the case, then we are not talking about a one-time mailing, but rather vexatious and aggressive spamming.

    Also, the fact that you can buy the email list of the student body from the school probably isn't common knowledge. In this day and age of identity theft, most people are especially sensitive to such things and would be livid to know that their information was made so easily accessible by a trusted institution.

    Either way, we'll have to agree to disagree on this one.

    Quote Originally Posted by mrfoos View Post
    I'm starting to understand why so many haunted houses fail.
    Indeed. Questionable, short-sighted, fly-by-night business practices, and all that . . .

    Quote Originally Posted by Skeered View Post
    I have a college in my town with 10k students. I would rather take that $300 and have extra flyers printed than have a spam list. I have in the past given the flyers to all the dorm monitors and they each in turn passed them out to all the dorm residents. I have a relationship with the workers in the food court areas where I can put them right next to the registers. I can reach most of the campus students this way and do it in a much less invasive way. Not to mention they have a physical flyer in their hand versus a spam filter or del key. Gives the feeling of a much more local and personal touch too versus email.
    Having a local college nearby is a true goldmine, and doesn't require any spamming at all. Not only are these all excellent methods to reach people, but there are so many other marvelous ways to market to them thru-out the year, and build an awareness for your event or show.

    Not only that, it is also very easy to build an opt-in email list, which is legit, and where the recipients actually look forward to receiving your emails, rather than anxiously looking to delete them.

    C.
     

  4. Default  
    #14
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    Aug 2010
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    Joshua
    www.hauntedprints.com
    info?hauntedprints.com

     

  5. Default  
    #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrfoos View Post
    I just like to point out that it's not illegal to send an unsolicited email as long as you are clearly identifying yourself and your business as laid out in the Can Spam act. Having apparently stumbled into a snakes den of religious anti-spam zealots who resort to personal attacks, I resign... as I'm sure most contributors due under the unrelenting pressure of the Wikipedia moderator generation.

    And BrotherMysterio, you remind me SO much of my older brother it's crazy. Can't wait to see the "quote=" and witty retort for each line.
    Well, I thought you weren't going to argue with a "know-it-all", yet you do try unrelentingly to get the last word in (something that your older brother probably finds amusing), but, either way, since the general consensus is that most people here aren't keen on spamming, I think it only appropriate that we press on, sans spam suggestion.

    C.
    Last edited by BrotherMysterio; 05-10-2012 at 11:37 PM.
     

  6. Default  
    #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrotherMysterio View Post
    Or it could also be one of those "third party announcements" options that auto-populate whenever you sign up for new email addresses, social media and networking accounts, and so on. There are so many "legit" ways for major companies to engage in email marketing, that they don't need to do baldfaced, blatant spamming.

    I finally rented a movie from Redbox for the 1st time 3 weeks ago. When it got to the part of asking for your email address I grudgingly typed it in. I knew I would receive some junk mail but didn't know what. Over the next week I received junk email from about 25 different senders. A couple reputable namebrands such as Snuggle fabric softener and Welch fruit snacks was the top two I recognized and they offered samples with their ads. Took about a week to stop receiving emails after unsubscribing to all of them. If anything I am quite impressed that when I unsubscribed, that meant unsubscribe and not a bunch of crap trickling in slowly. Just goes to show how much value is placed in not pissing off potential customers.
     

  7. Default  
    #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skeered View Post
    I finally rented a movie from Redbox for the 1st time 3 weeks ago. When it got to the part of asking for your email address I grudgingly typed it in. I knew I would receive some junk mail but didn't know what. Over the next week I received junk email from about 25 different senders. A couple reputable name-brands such as Snuggle fabric softener and Welch fruit snacks was the top two I recognized and they offered samples with their ads. Took about a week to stop receiving emails after unsubscribing to all of them. If anything I am quite impressed that when I unsubscribed, that meant unsubscribe and not a bunch of crap trickling in slowly. Just goes to show how much value is placed in not pissing off potential customers.
    Indeed. Incidentally, you don't have to enter an email address. You can opt out of that.

    C.
     

  8. Default  
    #18
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    Nov 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrfoos;
    religious anti-spam zealots who resort to personal attacks
    What personal attack?
     

  9. Default  
    #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrfoos View Post
    You mean like this?
    No, more like that.

    Frankly, I'm not interested in a flame war, which is pointless. Either way, like I said, we'll simply have to agree to disagree.

    As for your other question, I have no idea what you are talking about. Who exactly are you emailing? The college registrar? The head of the entertainment committee? What exactly are you talking about? I'm not sure you're clear on your actual question.

    Either way, there are legit ways to build email lists where the recipients are actually happy to receive email messages, and those email messages are considered value added.

    Apart from that, I'm not quite sure why you've spent some seven posts promoting spamming as a legit business practice. I'd say we simply press on with other methods of cheap to free marketing methods.

    C.
    Last edited by BrotherMysterio; 05-11-2012 at 12:14 AM.
     

  10. Default Any "Advertising" 
    #20
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    Has to be or to get noticed to have a chance of stimulating customers.
    What do they notice? Usually something strange, funny, different from the perceived "norm", I say.
    When the Ford Motor Company began they were just barely in business when some anonymous person began printing postcards with simple cartoons making fun of the Model "T" Ford!
    This was Ford's secret marketing tool that worked very well, considering how many years they manufactured the same car and how many they sold.
    People like to laugh and think at the same time. (Some feel it as the ultimate challenge, maybe?)
    My old, first flyers were full of my own drawings and silly sayings and people noticed them, thought about my place. Another bunch of my flyers for many years featured an original poem I wrote, with funny lines concerning my house and how people reacted to fear.
    Some young men would have contests with one another in a tavern 30 miles away as they were shooting pool attempting to recite that poem from memory! (I would then assume this did stick with them then..)
    My first "Haunted Parade car" was not a hearse, it was a 1979 Ford Thunderbird with a huge dent in the passenger door that I filled with a motorcycle wreck that happened to have a skeletal rider still seated on the bike! This Got Noticed!
    I would drive this car 25 miles away to go shopping and people would follow me right back to my house!
    Everytime I drove this car around people would show up that night because of seeing it.
    I still think good advertising requires much more "Thought" than "money".
     

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