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Thread: Wall panel design ?'s

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  1. Default Wall panel design ?'s 
    #1
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    Nov 2011
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    I looked but couldn't find my question / answer.


    I've seen some pictures where they were built both ways. But more it seems this way: 3 vertical boards and 2 end boards (2x3's or 2x4's) instead of 3 horizontal boards and 2 vertical side boards. I'm not a carpenter I don't know the correct terms.


    Is there an advantage of one over the other? Why do most people use a middle board running up and down instead of side to side, it seems to me it would be better and more cost effective.

    Thanks guys,

    Dewayne
     

  2. Default  
    #2
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    Im guessing its because the panel is better protected if somebody crashes into it. The vertical would leave the plywood less exposed for a clean hit. Whereas a horizontal in the middle would leave open two large squares that would be weak if hit in the middle.

    The book I read by JB corn only had a small square (cut off of a 2x4) in the very center, to make it so they didn't bow while stacked in storage.

    Im sure others will say more but to me that seems why.
     

  3. Default  
    #3
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    I do three horizontal and two vert, thats just my way- it is personal preference- no more than that.
     

  4. Default  
    #4
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    Thanks guys. Allen, do you use a jig? Or any of you, use a jig? If so, have any pics?

    I basically built a panel and put down some blocks on the inside of the frame and some on the outside. The first one was fairly square, but my air gun hits with so much steenking force it's retarded, and I think it'll eventually knock things loose. The frame will be re-secured with screws, as soon as I get them here. I bought framing guns because of the usual reasons of ease.
     

  5. Default  
    #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frightener View Post
    Thanks guys. Allen, do you use a jig? Or any of you, use a jig? If so, have any pics?

    I basically built a panel and put down some blocks on the inside of the frame and some on the outside. The first one was fairly square, but my air gun hits with so much steenking force it's retarded, and I think it'll eventually knock things loose. The frame will be re-secured with screws, as soon as I get them here. I bought framing guns because of the usual reasons of ease.
    this is a good jig. You need to pause, replay, and watch carefully to see both the construction and process. look closely at the two perimeter boards that give the sheathing a square seat into the jig, the entire jig base needs to be raised as shown if you use a perimeter seat like this, which I like because it's sturdier than trying to tack into the side of a .5" ply sheath. Better to raise the whole base plate up and use 2x6 or 2x8 so long as you support the entire base from the bottom.

    This panel serves whatever need they've identified, it wouldn't be optimal in some situations but may be in others. Note they're using what appear to be 2x2 furring strips, and Luan, very thin, light, and strong.

    Some notes on the speed, note the guy pre-drilling the beam connections, thus the speed of driving the screw. They're only using one screw which is smart because by air nailing brads or staples the sheathing is providing tension strength similar to a floor or roof to studs. This panel is really more like a hollywood flat notice how it flexes when they remove it from the jig - some of these will be double sheathed which will further increase strength and that flex would be gone.



    The dude in the white tee is pre-drilling then the others are leapfrogging each other with the deck screws. The gluing is also giving some strength. but adds considerable expense.
    Last edited by Twin Locusts; 05-22-2012 at 08:49 PM.
     

  6. Default  
    #6
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    Awesome! I saw this video a while back and lost it. Thanks for posting it!


    Dewayne
     

  7. Default  
    #7
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    I do use a jig, it will be on my design DVD that gets released at MHC
     

  8. Default  
    #8
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    I do use a jig, it will be on my design DVD that gets released at MHC. It is in editing now but I do talk a bit about panels and my jig.
     

  9. Default  
    #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allen H View Post
    I do use a jig, it will be on my design DVD that gets released at MHC. It is in editing now but I do talk a bit about panels and my jig.
    How long do you expect it to be?

    C.
     

  10. Default  
    #10
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    The video will be about 2hrs...I have to keep it to that, it kills me to produce the dual layer and two disc sets- I need to keep it to 2hs so I can keep it $20. I dont want to hijack the thread though.
    Allen H
     

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