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Thread: How do you build wall panels?

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  1. Default  
    #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    540
    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Chrise View Post
    I'm guessing he lives in Virginia, english is not his normal language, spanish is sort of, and even that is messed up because he is deaf and about 34 by now and on drugs. But, that is just a guess. Decorating the front porch of his dad's house is a challenge with help from his uncle, freind next door and maybe grandfather?

    And for people in altered conciousnesses like this I AM THE MODERATOR EL SUPREMO and you CAN make a rectangle out of two triangles if they are in the same plane and the length and hypotenuse is larger/greater than the width. It just requires screws that are 48 inches long. Then file the ends off if they stick out anywhere. Do not use power tools for any of this screwing or filing, do it all old school for quality.
    Um... *lip smack lip smack* ... yeup.


    I lol'd.
     

  2. Default Triangle? 
    #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Prattville Alabama
    Posts
    134
    You know"Triangles" could make some pretty obscure walls. Definently not what anyone would expect to see. You might have to use a few more braces to hold them up, but could turn out pretty wierd. Maybe I'll try some cardboard models to see what can be done with "Triangles".
     

  3. Default  
    #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Omaha, NE
    Posts
    156
    Im glad to share that this post at least helped me lol. I didn't catch before that they are PLYWOOD triangles... I assumed metal, and thought damn that might get expensive! Glad I read this post
     

  4. Default  
    #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by BrotherMysterio View Post
    JB Corn's book has a lot of excellent info on that and goes into the topic thoroughly. In fact, he tells you how to build an entire haunt from the ground up . . . literally. (His was built on a deck so it could be built over any terrain . . . an ATH: All Terrain Haunt!) I can send you the link to a PDF version if you like. His books are now free and in the public domain.

    C.
    Would you mind if I can have a link to that file?
     

  5. Default  
    #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    613
    Quote Originally Posted by rfsystems View Post
    You know"Triangles" could make some pretty obscure walls. Definently not what anyone would expect to see. You might have to use a few more braces to hold them up, but could turn out pretty wierd. Maybe I'll try some cardboard models to see what can be done with "Triangles".
    Post pics!

    Quote Originally Posted by Dark Hill Haunts View Post
    Would you mind if I can have a link to that file?
    Sent!

    Just don't use OSB. Trade that one bit out for some 5mil plywood. A lot lighter, easier to paint, and doesn't soak up moisture like a sponge.

    C.
     

  6. Default  
    #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    540
    I agree. The ONLY reason I'm using OSB is because budget got tight quick! Even the double sided panels are going up one sided, and will be getting the 2nd after it's up.

    If this is a success for us, meaning, if it pays next years rent, we'll be doing the rest in all Luan or similar. Our store doesn't have anything labeled "luan", so the only thing I figured was the 1/4 underlayment. Looks exactly the same, may just be different places have different names? Like Masonite, when I went to find masonite for my airbrushing shirt boards, all I found with that name was the siding!

    I already had a couple of thousand nails with the airguns, so I'm using nails for the frames for the time being. We're still using 2x3's, but really, they're not THAT much more than the 2x2's here, and 'sides, if you saw our options for the 2x2's you'd laugh. Not a straight board in the bunch. Lowe's or Home Depot in 30 miles both fail to carry a good 2x2.


    Dewayne
     

  7. Default  
    #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    613
    Quote Originally Posted by Frightener View Post
    Not a straight board in the bunch. Lowe's or Home Depot in 30 miles both fail to carry a good 2x2.
    An all too common occurrence, regrettably. As for the rest of it, well, work with what you got.

    Right now I'm working on a 13 string bass, and I'm using pine to do the proof of concept, cuz that's what I got. As soon as things sort out, I'm going with the good stuff.

    C.
     

  8. Default  
    #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Tyler, Texas, United States
    Posts
    2,614
    I have buckets full of 8 inch triangles already painted for back corner support and generally don't even install them until a panel becomes weak or needs a repair.


    Nails are still a definite no no. As the panel wiggles around these nails can work their way out and become things for patrons to get cut on as they go by. With screws you can take off a whole piece of lumber and replace it. Some things being not totally square are okay but then you discover some helper did something totally irregular and have to redo it. With screws you can totally redo it. Sometimes you don't find wonky things until you are setting up. Trying to stick this next to that. Even doing everything yourself you become tired and have to deal with #2 and #3 lumber that you think you have bent straight and then screwed in. Again you don't find it until you actually try to set up.


    Another fabulous post from the U.S.Department of Wild Imaginings, now in spectaclar stereo, sponsored by the Adhesives and Sealants Council, suggesting ways to stick things together since the 1800s. Not fabulous in a gay way. Your results may vary. Illinois residents add 8% sales tax. These posts have been made by professional post makers, do not try this type of posting on your own without extensive training, lovely assistants and a trusty clown horn.
     

  9. Default  
    #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    540
    Just got back from looking around at the buildings. Actually the last thing we were doing, was we were only using the nailguns to get the panels in place, usually 1 maybe 2 nails, then screwing the rest.

    It got to the point my brother was building the panels as I was finishing putting one up, or putting foam up / carving. He was also using mainly screws for the frame, but still using nails for the panel. I think I'm going to go ahead and switch still. I see a LOT of folks still using staples in luan. So I believe I may try a 50/50 with screws and brads. Staples are double and grab and keep from twisting more than a nail. I may pick one up as well, not sure.

    Our panels are going together nicely, however, the end walls, and some of the other walls I really don't want to have to repair / replace.


    Dewayne
     

  10. Default  
    #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Tyler, Texas, United States
    Posts
    2,614
    Repair or replace sound like words to me. They really mean being able to get crap apart and use some things or throwing broken crap into the land fill because it can't come apart and be repaired easily, then needs to be replaced. Staples do not come apart and I have spent countless hours getting things apart and digging out the little ends of things with vice grips screw drivers, various pliers and pry bars. All this real work has my muscles strong enough to rip my own joints apart if that is somehow impressive but, if it was all screws you can have some of the very same lumber being of service for 30 years.

    You would be surprised how much abuse things take. Usually this abuse is in tearing it apart and moving it off season, people dropping it and leaning tons of things on each other. Although not intentional I have dropped panels in tearing the whole thing down and broke the verticle boards right in half. I have had actors beat the sheeting off the lumber and someone has to fix all this stuff.

    Staples are great if you are building 5,000 SF really fast and selling it to someone else to worry about the maintenance or disposal. I had one guy that did a lot of that put in a small nail to keep things in place while he lined things up, looks really pro when doing it but again, I'm the idiot that ends up finding these damn nails and figuring out how to get them out of this or that. Screws can generally be gotten out somehow.

    In short, just so you know, I said NO!


    Another fabulous post from the U.S.Department of Wild Imaginings, now in spectaclar stereo, sponsored by the Adhesives and Sealants Council, suggesting ways to stick things together since the 1800s. Not fabulous in a gay way. Your results may vary. Illinois residents add 8% sales tax. These posts have been made by professional post makers, do not try this type of posting on your own without extensive training, lovely assistants and a trusty clown horn.
     

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