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Thread: How do you build wall panels?

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  1. Default  
    #31
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Tyler, Texas, United States
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    2,614
    No..........


    Another fabulous post from the U.S.Department of Wild Imaginings, now in spectaclar stereo, sponsored by the Adhesives and Sealants Council, suggesting ways to stick things together since the 1800s. Not fabulous in a gay way. Your results may vary. Illinois residents add 8% sales tax. These posts have been made by professional post makers, do not try this type of posting on your own without extensive training, lovely assistants and a trusty clown horn.
     

  2. Default  
    #32
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Tyler, Texas, United States
    Posts
    2,614
    no.........


    Another fabulous post from the U.S.Department of Wild Imaginings, now in spectaclar stereo, sponsored by the Adhesives and Sealants Council, suggesting ways to stick things together since the 1800s. Not fabulous in a gay way. Your results may vary. Illinois residents add 8% sales tax. These posts have been made by professional post makers, do not try this type of posting on your own without extensive training, lovely assistants and a trusty clown horn.
     

  3. Default  
    #33
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Tyler, Texas, United States
    Posts
    2,614
    For the love of God, No.


    Another fabulous post from the U.S.Department of Wild Imaginings, now in spectaclar stereo, sponsored by the Adhesives and Sealants Council, suggesting ways to stick things together since the 1800s. Not fabulous in a gay way. Your results may vary. Illinois residents add 8% sales tax. These posts have been made by professional post makers, do not try this type of posting on your own without extensive training, lovely assistants and a trusty clown horn.
     

  4. Default  
    #34
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    540
    I meant "Screws and STAPLES" not brads.

    Yeah, we went full screws today. We built about 10 more panels, some double and some single sided, but went all screws.

    I did find however, since I started using Luan / underlayment boards that these things, even double sided are about HALF the weight, if not less than, than the osb single sided panels!

    That's great and all, but how the heck do you keep these things in place? My other panels are heavy, so they sit well once in place and screwed. Like for instance, when we go to mount up the double luan (lets just call it luan) panels that are double sided, how would you guys mount that? Up until this point, any double sided panels have had their backsides added on last... ie: AFTER screwing the studs together. This is a main wall and shouldn't have to come off until repairs are needed that we did this to, but what about the upcoming wall I have, that may very well need to be moved next year for room arrangement. How do I secure these things to other walls if they're double sided? This haunt WILL NOT be taken down and stored, panels will only be moved when necessary.

    SO .. .how about it? Greg? Anyone? I know we don't WANT to have to take a panel off just to get to unscrew a wall panel from the adjacent one... so what then? Do you just use the top brace runners only?


    Sorry if my post is jagged. I'm tired. It's 10 pm here and I just got in to eat. Done for the night. Been at it most of the day.

    Thanks.

    Dewayne
     

  5. Default connecting double sided panels 
    #35
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Prattville Alabama
    Posts
    133
    There are may options to connect double sided panels... You can can do metal plates that screw to the face of of the panels, you can move the bottom piece of wood up the panel and shorten up the side pieces so you can slide the bottom of the plywood over a long 2x4 (the length of 2 or more panels, depending on the length of your wall) Or you can just screw a board base board to the face of multiple panels. Connecting multiple panel can be simple or very complex depending on your design. If you're looking for something quick and easy, Lowes and Home Depot stock flat metal plates with pre-drilled holes in their framing bracket section. (ask the store employee where the joist hangers are)

    Hope this helps...
     

  6. Default  
    #36
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    Aug 2003
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    Tyler, Texas, United States
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    2,614
    Yep, metal predrilled pieces, Simpson Strong Tie brand name at Home Depot or Lowes. An A-21 for anything angled and an A-33 0r A-35? For flat. Each one with 4 screws holds up to 175 pounds in a huricane. It is best to have them 2 on each side of every joint. Or some people make their own from random metal sheeting. Punching holes. They used to be cheap.

    The baseboard and one on the top works too but metal is better, overall cheaper. You just touch up paint after construction is over. If they still move around because they are too light and you are outside, it is rebar pounded into the ground and electrical clamp time.


    Another fabulous post from the U.S.Department of Wild Imaginings, now in spectaclar stereo, sponsored by the Adhesives and Sealants Council, suggesting ways to stick things together since the 1800s. Not fabulous in a gay way. Your results may vary. Illinois residents add 8% sales tax. These posts have been made by professional post makers, do not try this type of posting on your own without extensive training, lovely assistants and a trusty clown horn.
     

  7. Default  
    #37
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    540
    Yeah, I thot of those in the shower. I guess paired with the running boards on top they should be fine. Plus, it's all up to the design, right? lol. Just make sure those aren't impact panels.


    Thanks,

    Dewayne
     

  8. Default  
    #38
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Tyler, Texas, United States
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    2,614
    Which ever way you adopt, you do it all the same so there is no fancy figuring out how to take it apart later. Not sure why I'm thinking you need auto air bag deployment systems? That would be a scare!
    Last edited by Greg Chrise; 07-23-2012 at 10:14 PM.


    Another fabulous post from the U.S.Department of Wild Imaginings, now in spectaclar stereo, sponsored by the Adhesives and Sealants Council, suggesting ways to stick things together since the 1800s. Not fabulous in a gay way. Your results may vary. Illinois residents add 8% sales tax. These posts have been made by professional post makers, do not try this type of posting on your own without extensive training, lovely assistants and a trusty clown horn.
     

  9. Default  
    #39
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Orange California
    Posts
    25
    I have always used 3 vertical 2x3 at 93"L and an additional 2x3 top and bottom at 48"L. I covered both sides with 7/16 OSB, smoother side out. I glued the OSB to the 2x3 with Gorilla glue(spray some water from a old windex bottle on the glue before you lay the OSB down as that's what Gorrilla glue reacts with so you get a really good bond). Add 3 to 5 1" staples down each 2x3 to hold it until it cures.

    Here's the important part. Overhang your OSB panel by 1/2 inch to the left or right when you glue it down, that is don't line it up perfectly over the 2x3's. Pay attention that both sides of the panel overhang the same side and make sure it is consistent throughout all of your panels. I just ripped a 2 1/2" wide piece of the OSB and used it a a template on the side of the 2x3 and lined up the edge of the 2x8 OSB on that.

    What you get is a LEGO effect where each panel slides into the next which creates a VERY strong wall and prevents and light coming from the next room.

    To connect the panels together, I used a Simpson 4x4 half base at the bottom and a Simpson tie plate at the top. You just slide it in half way in so that it straddles the joint. Slide the next panel in and use 1 1/4 drywall screws to hold it in place. Do not put any screws in until both panels are in place as it will squeeze the 4x4 half base together and make it harder to slide the next panel together. screw the tie plate onto the top and you are done. Make sure you screw into the 2x3 and not just into the OSB.

    Where you have 2 walls intercept, use a T strap at the top instead of the straight one, and 2 Simpson framing angles at the bottom.

    You can use OSB, Luan or Playwood depending on budget, but the OSB is very heavy and helps create additional stability because it is so massive...and its the least expensive. Most haunts are fairly dark inside and wasting money on smooth walls could be better spent on getting people to focus their attention elsewhere in the room, say like a severed head ;-)
     

  10. Default  
    #40
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    613
    Quote Originally Posted by ravensmoon View Post
    I have always used 3 vertical 2x3 at 93"L and an additional 2x3 top and bottom at 48"L. I covered both sides with 7/16 OSB, smoother side out. I glued the OSB to the 2x3 with Gorilla glue(spray some water from a old windex bottle on the glue before you lay the OSB down as that's what Gorrilla glue reacts with so you get a really good bond). Add 3 to 5 1" staples down each 2x3 to hold it until it cures.

    Here's the important part. Overhang your OSB panel by 1/2 inch to the left or right when you glue it down, that is don't line it up perfectly over the 2x3's. Pay attention that both sides of the panel overhang the same side and make sure it is consistent throughout all of your panels. I just ripped a 2 1/2" wide piece of the OSB and used it a a template on the side of the 2x3 and lined up the edge of the 2x8 OSB on that.

    What you get is a LEGO effect where each panel slides into the next which creates a VERY strong wall and prevents and light coming from the next room.

    To connect the panels together, I used a Simpson 4x4 half base at the bottom and a Simpson tie plate at the top. You just slide it in half way in so that it straddles the joint. Slide the next panel in and use 1 1/4 drywall screws to hold it in place. Do not put any screws in until both panels are in place as it will squeeze the 4x4 half base together and make it harder to slide the next panel together. screw the tie plate onto the top and you are done. Make sure you screw into the 2x3 and not just into the OSB.

    Where you have 2 walls intercept, use a T strap at the top instead of the straight one, and 2 Simpson framing angles at the bottom.

    You can use OSB, Luan or Playwood depending on budget, but the OSB is very heavy and helps create additional stability because it is so massive...and its the least expensive. Most haunts are fairly dark inside and wasting money on smooth walls could be better spent on getting people to focus their attention elsewhere in the room, say like a severed head ;-)
    Excellent treatment of the subject! Thank you for your contribution and welcome to the forums! I'm sure you'll fit right in.

    (Don't know if that's a good thing, as we're all a bit crazy here, but we like to call this place home.)



    C.
     

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