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Thread: Need help!!!

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  1. Default Need help!!! 
    #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    9
    We have a 16 ft long hallway that we have completely blackened out, the original plan called for strobes at each end and "ribbed" effect giving the tunnel a shrinking effect. Somehow I have failed miserably and cannot get this accomplished. I am looking for any suggestions on how to make the effect work or to come up with something for this tunnel. I have officially declared war on the tunnel and am determined to win! LOL!

    Any help, suggestions are greatly appreciated! I hope everyone has an AWESOME season!!!!

    Thanks!
    Stephanie
     

  2. Default  
    #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    613
    Quote Originally Posted by hfproductions2010 View Post
    We have a 16 ft long hallway that we have completely blackened out, the original plan called for strobes at each end and "ribbed" effect giving the tunnel a shrinking effect. Somehow I have failed miserably and cannot get this accomplished. I am looking for any suggestions on how to make the effect work or to come up with something for this tunnel.
    What's your theme and how many funhouse style effects do you have?

    C.
     

  3. Default  
    #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    9
    Our house is set up with each room is it's own theme and this dark hallway is after a barn scene but before our bloody sheet maze. We don't really have any "Fun house effects", we were going to leave it as a dark tunnel and our haunt is wheelchair accessible so we are limited with what we can do with it, which is why we were thinking of this "shrinking" effect. To do something different without compromising our wheelchair accessibility.

    Any all suggestions are welcomed!!! I hate to just leave it a dark tunnel.

    Thanks again!
     

  4. Default Hall of Fog 
    #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Orlando
    Posts
    35
    You could plumb fog into the bottom of the hallway. If you somewhat seal the roof and add vinyl (or thick plastic) strips to the entrance and exit, the hallway would contain the fog for a little while. Keep the strobe lights and you still won't be able to see where you are going. Just a thought on a "cheap" effect. Good luck.

    -Mike
     

  5. Default  
    #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    East Haven, Connecticut, United States
    Posts
    1,162
    how about a laser vortex?? you can have an actor outside of the laser, and with fog, he can see into the laser generated vortex but your clients wouldn't be able to see him and it could be a really neat and super inexpensive scare. (trying to work off the fog and tunnel idea)
     

  6. Default  
    #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    612
    So to add to your last suggestion, this is something that I learned late in the season last year.

    I took a strobe light and had it facing toward the patrons as they walked up to a scene and used a steady to faster flash. This in turn created what I would like to call the black whole or what ever you would like to call it.

    This light effect creates a "dark zone" behind the light, as I forgot to mention this strobe light was at about knee level but could be used at waist level. Now like I said, the "dark zone" behind the light is a place where you can use an actor that as your patrons walk toward them they will never see them because of the light if they crouch or kneel down directly behind the light.


    The scare I used this for was an out door trail. As you walk down on the right side there was an actor in a small cemetery that provided the distraction. The strobe light was like I said knee level on the left side with me the second actor crouched down behind the light. As people would walk up they would be to foccused on the distraction actor and then at the right moment I would what appear pop out of the air and do the actual scare.


    LOVED it and would use it again.


    Mr. Haunt
    Last edited by Mr. Haunt; 09-17-2012 at 04:27 PM.
     

  7. Default  
    #7
    Mike Chambers Guest
    A polka dot room or paint a checker board effect (black and white) and place a mirror at the end of the hall and use the strobes with that. I have in the past with a blacked out hall. Hang long lengths of fishing line from the ceiling with strobes going off and the line touching the people it kinda plays on there senses. It freaked alot of people out. always thought of using ankle ticklers in this. Hope this helps.

    Mike
     

  8. Default  
    #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Tyler, Texas, United States
    Posts
    2,614
    From a barn to bloody sheets means to me it isn't a hallway, it is a tool room with all the old fashioned saws and grass hackers, shovels and picks you can find for free or at massive flea market outings, paint them up a bit and screw everything to the wall. Pondering what is this in a tight space and then the maybe more airy sheet room and it you have planted the imagination that there is someone with hacking type tools in here and you can't see a foot in front of you.

    I kind of spent years accumulating this kind of stuff. Of course it is in Texas and no one is brilliant enough to keep tools inside so they are rusty and can be taken away for free or very little money. It can be a few simple things just to plant the idea or it is the crazy shed they first walked into in the movie Tornado. For the most part it is just knowing what to ask for and start hitting places that even have old tools for the ones that are not repairable and worth only scrap value.

    Silver spray paint and blood on them against a black background, low light and done. No actor needed, something to worry about and look at.


    Another fabulous post from the U.S.Department of Wild Imaginings, now in spectaclar stereo, sponsored by the Adhesives and Sealants Council, suggesting ways to stick things together since the 1800s. Not fabulous in a gay way. Your results may vary. Illinois residents add 8% sales tax. These posts have been made by professional post makers, do not try this type of posting on your own without extensive training, lovely assistants and a trusty clown horn.
     

  9. Default  
    #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    613
    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Chrise View Post
    paint them up a bit and screw everything to the wall.
    Brilliant idea as always. Be sure to point the blades away from the patrons, and dull them down on a grinder so they aren't sharp. You don't need any curious kids cutting themselves.

    Oh, btw, be sure to spray the area down with long-standing dust and discoloration in the paint, and have a few empty spots towards the end of the hallway where some especially nasty implements used to be. That will have them wondering where those tools went to, and, more importantly, who has them, and will they run into them.

    C.
     

  10. Default  
    #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Tyler, Texas, United States
    Posts
    2,614
    The bigger more industrial blades you can find the better. Bigger things have tips on them that are usually removed because of the material value and so, you really don't have a sharp edge at all, just a place where a tip would be welded to in order to use it. It just gives the impression of being a real saw blade. Big circular blades look great. Tranfering the information as you walk by at some pace. Not the thing you see every day, some serious stuff. Crazy things. The items that might be smaller and actually dangerous you just put up higher like above 6.5 feet. Nice for display.

    You can find one authentic big saw blade and make many more out of anything, wood, cardboard, sheet plastic, mud flaps from a big truck, paint and they look the same only now there are half a dozen. Plastic signs.

    Another trick for those that are open many week, you can just keep adding detail week to week with the over all idea of having designed a room for the future.


    Another fabulous post from the U.S.Department of Wild Imaginings, now in spectaclar stereo, sponsored by the Adhesives and Sealants Council, suggesting ways to stick things together since the 1800s. Not fabulous in a gay way. Your results may vary. Illinois residents add 8% sales tax. These posts have been made by professional post makers, do not try this type of posting on your own without extensive training, lovely assistants and a trusty clown horn.
     

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