HauntWorld Home - Forums Home - Live Chat - Find Haunted Houses - Hauntworld Magazine - Haunted House Supplies - America's Best Haunts - Find Vendors
Haunted House News - Haunted Tradeshows - Join Hauntworld Facebook - Hauntworld Twitter - Advertise - Contact Us

Thread: Brick Facade ideas needed

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 27
  1. Default Brick Facade ideas needed 
    #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    107
    Looking to put up a brick facade 16'-18' in height and about 125'-150' in length.

    Pink foam is my first choice because of price, weight, and I can work with it to make it however I wanted to look. Downside is my facade will be up all year. 100 degrees in the summer and low 20's during the winter. Don't want it to blow away in the wind either. I also would have to figure out how I would want to mount it as well.

    Any ideas cause faux brick panels cost money and finding enough used or surplus brick may be a problem as well.
     

  2. Default  
    #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    1,229
    Shane, Graystone on here, turned me onto this cool brick paneling from Lowes.

    It's not too expensive, in fact, if you compare it with the final costs of time/labor/paint/hard coating of doing the brick into pink foam, it's about the same in price. And if you buy a LOT you can get some pretty nifty discounts. And it looks INCREDIBLE!

    Oh and they're sold in 4x8 sheets, and are VERY sturdy.
     

  3. Default  
    #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    88
    Quote Originally Posted by Skeered View Post
    Looking to put up a brick facade 16'-18' in height and about 125'-150' in length.

    Pink foam is my first choice because of price, weight, and I can work with it to make it however I wanted to look. Downside is my facade will be up all year. 100 degrees in the summer and low 20's during the winter. Don't want it to blow away in the wind either. I also would have to figure out how I would want to mount it as well.

    Any ideas cause faux brick panels cost money and finding enough used or surplus brick may be a problem as well.
    Try this from Home Depot.
    http://www.homedepot.com/buy/4-ft-x-...l#.UKbDdX1MHMI
     

  4. Default  
    #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    107
    Yeah. Those gaslight panels are only $26 a sheet versus $8.5 for a sheet of pink foam. They also had wood fibers on the back so maybe not completely water resistant if water hits the backside. A guy I know has a cnc router. Thought I would let him route out all the mortar grooves on pink foam and I would distress, heat gun it, and paint them. Still doesn't help though with them being flimsy and vulnerable as they are though. I'll have to look around more to see if I can find some of those panels at a better rate and go from there...
     

  5. Default  
    #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    393
    The brick panels from Lowes are nice but too clean looking as is so you'd have to paint them up a little to age them. Also they are not meant for outdoor use once they get wet they will buckle.


    Jake
     

  6. Default  
    #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    393
    If using foam you'd still need a wood base at least and then the foam so that will add costs. The foam will need to be hard coated which is costly too.

    Jake
     

  7. Default  
    #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    1,229
    Latex paint the whole backside and any other exposed wood surface, will help make it weather resistant. They are clean, but that's what haunter creativity is for, water down some ugly paint and go hard!!
     

  8. Default  
    #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Waverly, Iowa
    Posts
    657
    I think pink foam may be the best bet for you. If done correctly, it can look quite convincing as well as hold up to the elements providing you seal/protect it correctly.
     

  9. Default  
    #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    107
    I did a 8x12 10'tall "brick room" in my haunt this year. I routered out all the brick lines, heat gunned it which hardened it, sprayed it with gray paint for the mortar grooves, then rolled on some red. Looked extremely nice and pretty tough.

    Whether I attach something directly to the building or set up poles against the building I am going to lathe it every 2' horizontally and 4' vertically. Maybe even block it every 2' vertically. Haven't got that far yet.

    What I wonder is how well the pink foam will hold up with 100 degree heat beating on it all day during the summer?
     

  10. Default I once bought... 
    #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Ravens Grin Inn, 411 carroll st.mount carroll ill.
    Posts
    12,813
    About 6 large pick up truck loads of antique, soft, illregular bricks for $100.oo
    They look "OLD, because they ARE! Saves time and money trying to make them look old, and they WILL take 100 degree heat!
    Bags of mortar have gotten cheaper around here at least. Customers will be impressed.
    OF course the easy way to impress them is to just have the real bricks installed at locations where they will be close to them and use the brick paneling for the further away locations.
    The ancient bricks I have are identicle to the bricks used in New Orleans on those above ground tombs.
    It is fun building a plywood and 2by 4 arch, laying the bricks up over it, then removing the plywood and WOW! Look at the nice real brick arch!
     

Thread Information
Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •