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Thread: Brick Facade ideas needed

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  1. Default  
    #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Kansas
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    421
    Quote Originally Posted by Skeered View Post
    Looking to put up a brick facade 16'-18' in height and about 125'-150' in length.

    Pink foam is my first choice because of price, weight, and I can work with it to make it however I wanted to look. Downside is my facade will be up all year. 100 degrees in the summer and low 20's during the winter. Don't want it to blow away in the wind either. I also would have to figure out how I would want to mount it as well.

    Any ideas cause faux brick panels cost money and finding enough used or surplus brick may be a problem as well.

    IMO, you're asking for a LOT here if you want it to last a long time- and why do it if you can't get your money's worth out of it?. I'm going out on a limb here and say that faux panels AND foam is going to fail you in the end if you think is can be accomplished on the cheap side.

    Even if you already had a solid backing to stick the foam to, it would still have to be hard coated in some way. If you just paint it, you'll either have to put up with an ever growing number of pink spots showing up, or be willing to repaint it yearly- and touch-ups look just that- like a touch-up. You'll be working for the wall, instead of the other way around...

    An 18' high x 150' long, real brick wall?! Jeebus!
    How can a man die better than facing fearful odds, for the ashes of his fathers and the temple of his gods.

    What you put into your mind- you put into your life.


    www.zombietoxin.com
     

  2. Default  
    #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Tyler, Texas, United States
    Posts
    2,614
    Everyone throws this word hard coat out there and I have no idea what they are talking about. Foam and the paint you put over it will put up with 100 degrees as long as the stucture inderneath isn't wobbling around in the wind all the time. Just look at any modern construction and they are going 30 and 40 foot high with metal studs, then 1/2 inch or 7/16 OSB, a layer of barrier cloth then white styrofoam and then stucco base coat, stucco texture finish an done. A serious number of anchors are shot through the foam and I have done mobile facades from pink foam that end up being 24 foot by 80. They are now more than 6 years old and stored outside in the open when not on location. Touching them up from handling and totally repainting them every couple years was in the plan.

    The act of freshening up paint jobs is like a performance art that "they are getting ready" and advertsing in a way. Seeing activity, it is going to be on this year.

    Just doing the heat gun hardens the surface. Now we do add cement formulas and additives rather than just water to provide a texture then paint, antique and final clear all in exterior grade acrylics. To make it last is simple, you have to use $50 a gallon paint instead of $25 per gallon paint even for the watered down washes. Do you want to paint every year or have the thing peel off and be unsightly or would you like to go about 5 years with out messing with it. That's the real difference. I seem to keep getting work because the old work still "sells" and I don't have to advertise or anything. If it was crap I think I would have been out of that game 18 years ago. The do it yourselfer doesn't get to see what happens over time, they only think about expense at that moment in time.

    Applying hard coats can be tricky and can delaminate as well so less is better. You have to adhere it to the panel with lots and lots of glue and possibly base coat the OSB on both sides before applying anything for it to last. Other fascades we have done are use mobile but are seriously heavy 3/4 plywood and 2 by 6 structures and usually some corner gets knocked off of the concrete over lay with a fork truck moving it around or almost dropping it. The styrofoam units can be assembled on the ground and a bunch of people stand it up and anchor it over large windows with heavy metal frames and bang, an architecual design from the 60s becomes haunted mansion in half a day. It is also located in tornado alley and is still being used.

    No, there are no pictures, I just do stuff.


    Another fabulous post from the U.S.Department of Wild Imaginings, now in spectaclar stereo, sponsored by the Adhesives and Sealants Council, suggesting ways to stick things together since the 1800s. Not fabulous in a gay way. Your results may vary. Illinois residents add 8% sales tax. These posts have been made by professional post makers, do not try this type of posting on your own without extensive training, lovely assistants and a trusty clown horn.
     

  3. Default  
    #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Redding
    Posts
    283
    65777_155819567797104_2527037_n.jpgIf you have the plywood up or even better would be hardibacker attached to the wood frame. So if its plywood you need a moisture barrier then attach chicken wire or there is stucco wire with moisture backing already on it, staple it up well to the plywood and do a thin layer of type s mortar to cover the wire let dry and tape off the 4x8 brick pattern with 1/2 inch fiber reinforced tape if you can't find it I keep it in stock, now after its all taped off mix up more type s mortar and add in terracotta color you can find it at Home Depot in dry or liquid then do a thin layer over the whole wall and if you want a old brick look slap some white and black paint all over it randomly then pull off all the tape leaving the new brick look and you can seal it to make it last longer if you would like. if you use hardi or wonder board you don't need the wire but tape the seams with the fiberglass drywall tape and then the first thin layer over that. Any questions just ask i do this also for my work www.icoatproducts.com I have the tape and sealers if you cant find them. I also have facebook pages under Ken Lavender. sorry photo is sideways.
    Last edited by Dreamreaper; 11-18-2012 at 10:10 AM.
     

  4. Default  
    #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Tyler, Texas, United States
    Posts
    2,614
    Ken, do you have a source for 3/4 inch reinforced tape? We have been reduced to doing 3/4 inch masking tape then layering 1/2 over that for a pattern.

    Thanks, Greg.


    Another fabulous post from the U.S.Department of Wild Imaginings, now in spectaclar stereo, sponsored by the Adhesives and Sealants Council, suggesting ways to stick things together since the 1800s. Not fabulous in a gay way. Your results may vary. Illinois residents add 8% sales tax. These posts have been made by professional post makers, do not try this type of posting on your own without extensive training, lovely assistants and a trusty clown horn.
     

  5. Default  
    #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Mesquite, TX
    Posts
    2,788
    I am one opinion of many, but I would do it in foam. It would not be cheap, but it will look better than brick board. I would carve the mortar lines with a soldering iron, heat gun it for texture, then use acrylic stucco (shot from a hopper) to coat it, and then detail paint the bricks. I am in Dallas TX and used the same techniques on white foam for my castle and it looks great after seven years.
    Allen H
     

  6. Default  
    #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Redding
    Posts
    283
    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Chrise View Post
    Ken, do you have a source for 3/4 inch reinforced tape? We have been reduced to doing 3/4 inch masking tape then layering 1/2 over that for a pattern.

    Thanks, Greg.
    Greg, I sell it. I have 3/4 1/2 3/8 1/4 and 1/8 fiberglass re enforced tape. My # 530-945-5125
     

  7. Default  
    #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Tyler, Texas, United States
    Posts
    2,614
    Cool. I had to buy tons of 1/2 inch at a time. I'm writing down your number.


    Another fabulous post from the U.S.Department of Wild Imaginings, now in spectaclar stereo, sponsored by the Adhesives and Sealants Council, suggesting ways to stick things together since the 1800s. Not fabulous in a gay way. Your results may vary. Illinois residents add 8% sales tax. These posts have been made by professional post makers, do not try this type of posting on your own without extensive training, lovely assistants and a trusty clown horn.
     

  8. Default  
    #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    107
    Quote Originally Posted by Allen H View Post
    I am one opinion of many, but I would do it in foam. It would not be cheap, but it will look better than brick board. I would carve the mortar lines with a soldering iron, heat gun it for texture, then use acrylic stucco (shot from a hopper) to coat it, and then detail paint the bricks. I am in Dallas TX and used the same techniques on white foam for my castle and it looks great after seven years.
    Allen H
    When you say you would do it in foam you are referring to just white foam as in your case correct? What kind of paint did you use on everything?
     

  9. Default  
    #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Mesquite, TX
    Posts
    2,788
    Id use pinkfoam. and exterior paint. That is about it.
     

  10. Default  
    #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    88
    Quote Originally Posted by Allen H View Post
    I am one opinion of many, but I would do it in foam. It would not be cheap, but it will look better than brick board. I would carve the mortar lines with a soldering iron, heat gun it for texture, then use acrylic stucco (shot from a hopper) to coat it, and then detail paint the bricks. I am in Dallas TX and used the same techniques on white foam for my castle and it looks great after seven years.
    Allen H
    Where do you get your foam? I am building an indoor facade after our Christmas event and was planning on using the foam carving technique. This is all new to me and I am just going off of what I have seen on youtube so wish me luck.
     

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