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Thread: Haunted House Maze Construction?

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  1. Default Haunted House Maze Construction? 
    #1
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    4
    I have a simple question that I think I already know the answer... I'm in the process of doing my pre-planning for a haunted house I plan on doing in 2015. I plan on using vacant commercial rental property, and the vacant properties that I have my eyes on are all old closed down grocery stores, so needless to say I will have more then enough room to do two haunted houses... a traditional style haunted house maze, and a basic black-light 3D house.

    In the meantime I'm doing an elaborate home haunt maze at my house this year and next year until I can get my ducks in a row for what will become a real Haunted Biz.

    My question is about the construction of the maze, and how the maze walls are secured to the floor. I used to work at Halloween Horror Nights in Orlando in set design and prop making, but I was never part of set construction. The park brought in outside construction contractors to build the mazes, and then we came along and added on to them with props, paint, sfx, and what not.

    I assume that the maze walls are secured to the concrete floor with concrete bolts, but want to confirm this and see what the options were for securing the walls.

    This is something I need to figure out before I begin negotiating with the rental company that owns the property in question. I need to figure it out so I can let them know in advance that I will be planning on drilling into their floor to secure the walls.

    I also know that I will need to run my building plans by the local Fire Marshall and building dept. first, but before I can even begin pricing out the cost of construction I will need to figure out this one item.

    I should had paid more attention when I was on HHN's staff but I was having too much fun doing what I do.

    Any pointers will be great!
     

  2. Default  
    #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    422
    Three possibilities really-

    Tapcon Screws 1/4" x 3" or bigger. Requires a hammer drill to pre drill the screw holes into the floor. Medium fast installation and pretty strong.

    Ramset nails 3". Requires the ramset gun which can be rented, power loads and nails. Really fast, but probably the weakest type of connection. May NOT be suitable if you have high impact expectations on your wall panels.

    Drop in concrete anchors. Requires a hammer drill again, anchors, threaded rod, nuts and washers. Slow installation, but the strongest by far.

    The all leave a mark- as in a hole in the floor. The tapcons probably leave the smallest hole and the ramsets usually end up leaving a small crater when pulled.

    You better talk to the property owner/manager about what method will keep you out of trouble with them first.

    Good luck
    How can a man die better than facing fearful odds, for the ashes of his fathers and the temple of his gods.

    What you put into your mind- you put into your life.


    www.zombietoxin.com
     

  3. Default  
    #3
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by zombietoxin View Post
    Three possibilities really-

    Tapcon Screws 1/4" x 3" or bigger. Requires a hammer drill to pre drill the screw holes into the floor. Medium fast installation and pretty strong.

    Ramset nails 3". Requires the ramset gun which can be rented, power loads and nails. Really fast, but probably the weakest type of connection. May NOT be suitable if you have high impact expectations on your wall panels.

    Drop in concrete anchors. Requires a hammer drill again, anchors, threaded rod, nuts and washers. Slow installation, but the strongest by far.

    The all leave a mark- as in a hole in the floor. The tapcons probably leave the smallest hole and the ramsets usually end up leaving a small crater when pulled.

    You better talk to the property owner/manager about what method will keep you out of trouble with them first.

    Good luck
    Awesome and thanks... my cousin is a local home builder and he suggested the Tapcon screws, and did not know of any other options. I figured that the walls were secured to the floor and I will have to drill.

    I might build a small mock test wall panel and put it up in my garage this summer to see how sturdy it is and how much damage the Tapcon screws do to my concrete both during the installation and removal. This way I can assure the property owner of how much mess I will make, assuming they will allow me to make a mess.

    My area has a ton of vacant commercial property to choose from so I should have the pick of the litter.
     

  4. Default  
    #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Eastlake, Ohio
    Posts
    836
    In our current location, I use 1/4" tapcons as well, just one on center of each wall.

    However, at our old location, we had to set up and tear down with no damage behind. A good amount of bracing, good wall placement, and wood shims, kept our walls from coming down for the 6 weeks we were open every year.
    Brian Warner
    Owner of Evilusions www.EVILUSIONS.com
    Technical Director of Forsaken Haunted House www.Forsakenhaunt.com
    Mechanical Designer (animatronics) at Gore Galore www.Gore-Galore.com
     

  5. Default  
    #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Brilliant Ohio
    Posts
    341
    Better to beg for forgiveness than ask for permission If your maze doesn't need to go all the way to the ceiling, why not "secure" the maze walls across the top of the walls, with 2x4's. Erect the walls as normal and instead of securing them into the floor, secure them at the top, kind of like sitting an open bottom cage on the floor. If done right, it could be very sturdy and thus eliminating the problem with the concrete floor. Building a sub floor, then building on top of it could also be an option
    Like a midget at a urinal, you gotta be on your toes

    http://www.wellstownshiphauntedhouse.com
     

  6. Default  
    #6
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    5
    After removing the 'Tap-Cons', go around and squeeze a dab of concrete repair 'stuff' (PL products) into each hole and smooth out with a putty knife. Won't even know that you put holes in the floor.
     

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