HauntWorld Home - Forums Home - Live Chat - Find Haunted Houses - Hauntworld Magazine - Haunted House Supplies - America's Best Haunts - Find Vendors
Haunted House News - Haunted Tradeshows - Join Hauntworld Facebook - Hauntworld Twitter - Advertise - Contact Us

Thread: How good are break beam sensors?

Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. Default How good are break beam sensors? 
    #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    107
    What is your experience with a break beam photoelectric sensor?

    Looking at getting 4-5 break beam sensors with reflectors to trigger a few of my props. The range I'm looking at is just 3'-4'. I read a couple threads on other websites where the sensors may get hot if on for long enough. They might need a couple minutes of "quiet time" to get straightened out in order to not give false readings. Some users had to put tubes over the lenses to narrow the focus. I never used them so I didn't know these problems existed to the extent from what I have read.
     

  2. Default  
    #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Eastlake, Ohio
    Posts
    834
    Quote Originally Posted by Skeered View Post
    What is your experience with a break beam photoelectric sensor?

    Looking at getting 4-5 break beam sensors with reflectors to trigger a few of my props. The range I'm looking at is just 3'-4'. I read a couple threads on other websites where the sensors may get hot if on for long enough. They might need a couple minutes of "quiet time" to get straightened out in order to not give false readings. Some users had to put tubes over the lenses to narrow the focus. I never used them so I didn't know these problems existed to the extent from what I have read.
    What you are reading about are PIR motion sensors. You will never have to narrow the beam, or allow quiet time to limit false readings on a "break beam" sensor. The proper name for a "break beam" is a retroreflective sensor. You can not get a better sensor, in my opinion, for haunted attraction use than a retroreflective. I have a large number of them in my attraction triggering all of my effects.

    I can get much more technical about various types of retroreflective sensors if desired.
    Brian Warner
    Owner of Evilusions www.EVILUSIONS.com
    Technical Director of Forsaken Haunted House www.Forsakenhaunt.com
    Mechanical Designer (animatronics) at Gore Galore www.Gore-Galore.com
     

  3. Default  
    #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    417
    I second that, however I think that pressure pads (although not as long lasting) have a real value in some cases for allowing your actors to avoid triggering the props while working all around them.
    How can a man die better than facing fearful odds, for the ashes of his fathers and the temple of his gods.

    What you put into your mind- you put into your life.


    www.zombietoxin.com
     

  4. Default  
    #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Eastlake, Ohio
    Posts
    834
    One thing I have done in the past is to install an actor by pass button, which allows a specific amount of time for them to reset, and pass thru the beam in either direction without setting off the effect.
    Brian Warner
    Owner of Evilusions www.EVILUSIONS.com
    Technical Director of Forsaken Haunted House www.Forsakenhaunt.com
    Mechanical Designer (animatronics) at Gore Galore www.Gore-Galore.com
     

  5. Default  
    #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    107
    Cool beans. Glad to hear the input..I thought these sensors would be good. I have seen the different types. I guess I just got mixed up on a thread as I hate motion detectors. I have a few areas where I absolutely can't have anything visible. Also will have to consider the simple bypass button idea.
     

  6. Default Fog 
    #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    257
    Keep in mind that fog will break the beam. So mount them low and in areas with not a lot of fog.

    http://www.frightprops.com/controlle...ntrollers.html

    Doug.
     

  7. Default  
    #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    28
    Keep in mind that both the beam projector and reflector have to be protected from customers bumping them.
     

  8. Default  
    #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Eastlake, Ohio
    Posts
    834
    Quote Originally Posted by MarkSchaefer View Post
    Keep in mind that both the beam projector and reflector have to be protected from customers bumping them.
    One of the reasons I tend to mount my sensors and reflectors behind wall panels. I drill a hole in the walls, that can easily be disguised as part of the set. Or I mount them in a way that they are protected and disguised, if aceess is not available behind that particular wall.


    Quote Originally Posted by FrightProps View Post
    Keep in mind that fog will break the beam. So mount them low and in areas with not a lot of fog.

    Doug.
    To prevent fog from triggering your sensor and effect accidentally, using a very good industrial retroreflective sensor with a high excess gain will help considerably. I have one sensor installed, triggering a giant fog cannon, in a hallway that is also fogged by a separate machine. I have never witnessed a false triggering with that particular installation. Less powerful sensors, not specifically designed for contaminated and dirty environments, can easily be triggered by fog. It's all about the correct sensor for that particular instance.
    Brian Warner
    Owner of Evilusions www.EVILUSIONS.com
    Technical Director of Forsaken Haunted House www.Forsakenhaunt.com
    Mechanical Designer (animatronics) at Gore Galore www.Gore-Galore.com
     

  9. Default  
    #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN
    Posts
    56
    We make several sensors designed to deal with these issues. We have a beam-break sensor, but it's not a retroreflector. These are separate active IR transmitter and receiver units. Our most popular sensor is an infrared beam-bounce sensor. Many people think it's a PIR, but it's transmitting a coded IR signal and looking for a reflection from a person or object passing in front of the sensor. A popular technique is to mount it overhead. The floor is out of range, but a person passing beneath will trigger the sensor.

    To deal with fog, we make a ranging ultrasonic sensor. Fog will reflect light, including IR, but it won't reflect sound, so no false trips from the fog.
    Steve Peterka
    Lights Alive
    www.lights-alive.com
     

Thread Information
Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •