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Thread: How Realistic Can You Be?

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  1. Default How Realistic Can You Be? 
    #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Ravens Grin Inn, 411 carroll st.mount carroll ill.
    Posts
    12,813
    Does it matter?
    Realistic on what level? As a character or do you get to blurr the line and seem to be a real person, thereby being even scarier when you get mentally off-center?
    Do customers ever ask you or other actors if you have ever been trained as an "actor"?
    Do you get enough time in your haunted venue to act the way that you would want to act, as far as time or the best situational opportunitys?
     

  2. Default realistic as you want 
    #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    1
    l believe you can be as realistic as you want..the more the better. If your really real, so to speak, you freak the shit out of the customers. l've found that to be very true. don't conversate with them and lf you do stay in character especially to those who have not gone through the attraction yet. When l'm working in house l never take a break, because l believe lt breaks the barrier....lf they see you walking around going to the bathroom,smoking and takin pic, lt breaks the realism factor
     

  3. Default  
    #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Roanoke, VA.
    Posts
    318
    Does it matter?
    Depends on what the situation, the scene, calls for. Yes you can go for realism, but sometimes it isn't what your patrons wish to see. On occasion the scene you're in is over-the-top; zombie radiation area, clown playroom, french chef kitchen, and so on, that scream twisted wackyness don't really fit the profile of "real". So what would be more entertaning given this scene? A realistic character is plausible, but an over-the-top one doesn't sound too bad either.
    Last edited by Smiley; 03-26-2008 at 04:34 PM.
     

  4. Default  
    #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Ravens Grin Inn, 411 carroll st.mount carroll ill.
    Posts
    12,813
    Sometimes a customer will hazard to ask me or just say it out loud,"Are you crazy?"
    Or they put it in a more deragatory form:"Are you nuts?"
    Then I may remind them that "they" bought a ticket to see "my" house, not the other way around.
    I try to impress upon them that I am now incharge of their immeadiate "fate"and maybe (at least in some ways?)" I might be more smarterz than thay R?"
    But of course with a whole different outlook concerning what should be happening to them as they are now a prisoner here with little or no rights. This all looks pretty dire seeing it in type but this whole message is more subtle than not, I think. I hope.
    When I am walking them through the concrete exit tunnel I am telling them the truth, I did dig the whole thing myself with a rather small shovel..when the average person begins to consider the physical commitment such a work-project requires..then they may become scard because they ARE in the close company of a really commited individual, and of course "commited" usually seems to have a negative connotation anymore.
    Of course I also did all the cement carrying and pouring and rebar work and form work, it ain't quick nor easy making a heavy-duty form snake around like that with a rounded ceiling and sidewalls bending back and forth so you "just" can't quite see around the curve just too far... a curved wall is inviting them to make a gradual decision as to whether proceed or not which throws the "blame" for them possibly then getting scared back upon them..a little bit.
     

  5. Default  
    #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Tallahassee, FL
    Posts
    341
    i like to screw with the minds, and talk to them "out of character" (when in reality, still in character). I like to complain about how dangerous the place is. "Man, you should have been here last night when the lady was stabbed with the pitchfork. What a MESS that was! How they kept it out of the papers I'll never guess." Or my favorite, "You're wearing sandals? Don't you know about the rats? You couldn't PAY me enough to come in here with exposed toes at rodent level. You're a braver person than I!" Then again, that only works if you're in make up and NOT a rubber mask!
     

  6. Default  
    #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    8
    ahh yeah people walking through have asked if I was an actor..it almost ruins it though. but yeah I think I have tried to perfect my part in the haunt. I've purposly broke down crying, lost my voice countless times screaming, had to deal with real spiders crawling next to me while trying to keep in character! thats hard!, and i've injured myself all too much on faulty, oversized props...lol. But yeah, its cool though i enjoy it...so i guess the job comes with knowing whats invloved in a way.
     

  7. Default  
    #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Traverse City, Michigan
    Posts
    123
    realism is good...since my character is...well...hehe....somewhat of a balanced human being, I am allowed to talk to the people...I usually start telling them the history of my hotel and tease at what I plan on doing....never give them details. When they ask if I'm trained as an actor...always respond in character....for those who think that the person was being a jerk, you just put them in their place. For that person, it makes them (usually lol) realise that you're serious about what your doing. It also just adds to the overall fun that everyone has....well anyways....happy haunting everyone...its just a lil cold in here and I think it's time I heat things up a lil
     

  8. Default "Are you a trained actor?" 
    #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Ravens Grin Inn, 411 carroll st.mount carroll ill.
    Posts
    12,813
    "Do I look like I got run over by a train!?"
    Do you see the edge of my training pants sticking above my big-person pants?
    "Trained", think about the word. The engine pulls, all the cars are forced to follow.
    I just decided I don't like the word "Trained" anymore.
    Why should I tie myself , then follow some huffing and puffing whistle -blowing full of hot air blowhard?
    "Choo, choo, choo, spit, swallow!
    Belch! Phartt! Away we go! Follow me! Suck my poisons!
     

  9. Default  
    #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Near Charlotte NC
    Posts
    1,051
    Every actor responds to areas in a different way. During the 2007 season, I worked in a "Scare Zone" that had several different types of characters. We had some that talked to people, some that chased, some that were completely wacked out, some who were sliders, and some that did a little of all. Some of them stayed that way all season, while others changed each night.

    I think having the variety makes for a better haunt and gives it a touch of realism.
     

  10. Default  
    #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Columbus Ohio, Hilltop
    Posts
    234
    I think that its great when you're so into character and really transform yourself from toes to nose that the public has trouble making themselves believe that you're jsut an actor. I debuted my new character this season and it was so good to hear from patrons trying to run from me saying "oh my god shes so friggin creepy" or "holy shit she's like the realest one."

    I think the trick is to create your character and never leave a stone unturned. From the movements of your fingertips to the way you blink your eyes to how you move and speak. I think the key to realisim is to really get into someones psyce that this is who you are and that they should with good reason be afraid of you. You have to look at them and force them to believe in you and the character you are.


    Odette
    “Happiness is the sublime moment when you step out of your corset at the end of the night.”

    “Actors love mental disorders, dialects, and corsets. Give them one of the three and they're happy.”
     

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